Videos https://www.ice.edu/ en A Croque Monsieur-Inspired Baked Potato https://www.ice.edu/blog/baked-potato-toppings <span>A Croque Monsieur-Inspired Baked Potato</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/25/2021 - 16:45</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/baked%20potato%20header.jpg?itok=kQNhGSdP Chef Frank roasts his potatoes in a salt crust and shares the recipe. <time datetime="2021-05-26T12:00:00Z">May 26, 2021</time> Frank Proto — Director of Culinary Operations <p>ICE Chef Frank Proto prepares a professional-level potato on Epicurious' 4 Levels series using all of the toppings that are usually on a traditional Croque Monsieur sandwich.</p> <p>Chef Frank demonstrates how to prepare a flavorful baked potato with crispy skin (and a bed of cheese). He uses a German butterball potato for dryness, fluffiness and a little bit of waxiness; flavored salt for a slight thyme flavor; and meat to add flavor. The base of his filling is Italian speck, a slightly smoky ham, and he tops the stuffed potato with French bechamel sauce and rich, grated Gruyere.</p> <p>Watch the demo in the video and get the complete recipe below.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wz0GkBkyH0Q?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <p>Study with Chef Frank in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/culinary-arts-info" target="_blank">Culinary Arts at ICE.</a></p> <h5>Croque Monsieur-Inspired Baked Potato</h5> <p><em>Yields 4 servings</em></p> <h5>Baked Potatoes</h5> <ul><li>4 large German butterball potatoes</li> <li>1 cup kosher salt</li> <li>8 sprigs thyme leaves, picked</li> <li>3 tablespoons olive oil</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Preheat the oven to 400 F.</li> <li>Place picked thyme and salt in a food processor and pulse.</li> <li>Coat potatoes lightly with oil and roll in the herb salt.</li> <li>Bake at 400 F for 10 minutes, then lower the oven to 350 F and cook until the potatoes are soft in the middle.</li> <li>When done, cut down the middle, scoop half of the insides out and place in a large bowl, set aside.</li> </ol><h5>Ham Filling</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>2 tablespoons butter</li> <li>1 large shallot, sliced</li> <li>4 ounces speck, julienned</li> <li>1 sprig thyme</li> <li>1/2-3/4 cup creme fraiche</li> <li>Potato insides (see above)</li> <li>Salt</li> <li>Pepper</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Heat the butter in a saute pan.</li> <li>Add the shallot and thyme, sweat.</li> <li>Add the speck and cook until lightly brown.</li> <li>Remove thyme and discard.</li> <li>Add mixture to the bowl of scooped out potato insides, then add the creme fraiche and mix well.</li> <li>Season with salt and pepper.</li> </ol><h5>Bechamel Topping</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>2.5 cups milk</li> <li>1.5 ounces butter</li> <li>1.5 ounces flour</li> <li>1 clove garlic, crushed</li> <li>1 small bay leaf, dried</li> <li>Salt</li> <li>Pepper</li> </ul> <ol><li>Heat butter in a saucepot.</li> <li>Add the flour and cook for 3-5 minutes without any color. It should smell like baking bread.</li> <li>Add the garlic, bay leaf and milk and bring to a simmer.</li> <li>Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring constantly.</li> <li>Remove from the heat, season and strain.</li> </ol><h3>Assembly</h3> <ul><li>1 cup Gruyere, grated</li> <li>Bechamel</li> <li>Potato filling</li> <li>Potato bases</li> </ul><ol><li>Stuff the potato bases with the ham-potato filling.</li> <li>Top with a thick layer of béchamel.</li> <li>Top with grated gruyere and place under the broiler until golden brown.</li> </ol> ICE Chef Epicurious Video Recipe Potatoes <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23021&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="MlizMLak2arkaciTi--4ev8TQAfrw5aM2CzYBXFxyXw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 25 May 2021 20:45:54 +0000 aday 23021 at https://www.ice.edu Types of Flour https://www.ice.edu/blog/best-flour-for-baking <span>Types of Flour</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/26/2021 - 13:31</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/flour%20header_0.jpg?itok=__N0PPmc Chef Carmine Arroyo explains how to determine the best flour for what you&#039;re baking. <time datetime="2021-01-26T12:00:00Z">January 26, 2021</time> ICE Staff <p>Artisan Bread Baking Chef-Instructor Carmine Arroyo has been a pastry chef for more than 15 years — that's a lot of experience working with flour. In the video below, he demonstrates how protein content affects the structure of baked goods.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GCWoX3VYtoU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h2>Flour Protein</h2> <p>Bakers and pastry chefs alike have a variety of flour to choose from today, from whole wheat flour and rye flour to nut flour and <a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/alternative-flours">alternative flours</a> for dietary customizations such as gluten-free. Selecting a flour depends on what you want to bake and the texture you desire.</p> <p>Hydrating a flour develops gluten. When you mix flour (and typically yeast) with water, you'll see a stretchy starter with high protein while a starter with lower protein content breaks and has less elasticity. Chef Carmine briefly demonstrates this experiment in the video above to breakdown the two main types of flour:</p> <h2>Bread Flour Protein Content</h2> <p>Whole wheat flour is essentially milled wheat berries, and where the wheat comes from as well as the time of year it's harvested affects the texture of the final product. It's a high-gluten bread flour with 13-15% protein that results in an open air structure and a soft crumb. With rye flour, bread gets a much tighter crumb structure. Rye flour has a gritty texture and a binding quality for a denser bread. Friendly carbohydrates cause the product to retain moisture, and the texture provides a very complex flavor. The bran and germ in both flours impact the nutritional content.</p> <h2>Cake Flour</h2> <p>Cake flour has 6-7% protein content, resulting in less structure for tender or delicate cakes, cookies or muffins. A very crumbly cupcake shows how fat from eggs and dairy can affect protein and texture.</p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/all?blog_category=211" target="_blank">Experiment with cake flour recipes.</a></p> <p>Chef Carmine recommends experimenting with flour varieties, whether organic flours, almond flour or oat flour, to find the best texture, test and aroma for your final product now that you have a primer on protein content.</p> <p><em>Get hands-on with all kinds of flour in <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/career-programs/school-pastry-baking-arts">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts</a> or <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" target="_blank">Artisan Bread Baking at ICE.</a></em></p> Bread Bread Baking Baking Arts Ingredient Exploration Food Science <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=22351&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="qgTB3FFt08Z_Tns1fzqbCXmDlMhdD-vqCyNHR3KkYeQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 26 Jan 2021 18:31:42 +0000 aday 22351 at https://www.ice.edu Why the Creaming Method is Essential for Cookies https://www.ice.edu/blog/creaming-method <span>Why the Creaming Method is Essential for Cookies</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/04/2020 - 12:42</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/creaming%20method%20header.jpg?itok=yVcoBps2 Ever wonder why cookie recipes require room temperature butter? <time datetime="2020-12-04T12:00:00Z">December 4, 2020</time> Kathryn Gordon — Chef-Instructor, Pastry &amp; Baking Arts <p>Pastry &amp; Baking Arts Chef-Instructor Kathryn Gordon demonstrates the creaming method, a fundamental technique for cakes, tart dough and cookies, using a recipe for pecan sablés from her second book "Les Petits Sweets."</p> <p>Temperature and timing are key when emulsifying, or mixing together, the fats and the water in butter and eggs, two of the most common baking ingredients. Chef Kathryn demonstrates how to turn a fluffy batter into perfect cookie dough, which can be frozen for up to two months to slice and bake when desired.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CUM20Mw4ZNE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h5>Pecan Sablé Cookies with Cinnamon and Orange</h5> <p>Recipe adapted from "Les Petits Sweets," co-authored with Anne E. McBride.</p> <ul><li>113 grams unsalted high-quality butter (I used cultured butter), room temperature</li> <li>60 grams confectioners’ sugar (10X)</li> <li>1/4 orange (2 grams), finely grated zest</li> <li>1 large egg yolk (18 grams), room temperature, whisked</li> <li>33 grams pecans, very finely chopped (to resemble almond flour texture)</li> <li>100 grams all-purpose flour</li> <li>1 gram ground cinnamon</li> <li>0.5 grams baking powder</li> <li>0.5 grams fine salt</li> <li>50 grams pearl sugar</li> <li>1 gram fleur de sel</li> </ul> <ol><li>In KitchenAid stand mixer, cream butter, confectioners’ sugar and orange zest with paddle attachment until fluffy. Slowly trickle in the egg yolk and mix until fluffy, stopping and scraping with a spatula as required. Add the pecans, flour, cinnamon, baking powder and fine salt.</li> <li>Roll the dough into a log on parchment paper, using the pearl sugar to help you form a 2-inch diameter log. Wrap up and freeze for 20 minutes or refrigerate for 30 minutes, until firm (or freeze up to 2 months).</li> <li>Preheat oven to 400 F. Slice the log into 1/3-inch (1 cm) slices and place on parchment paper (using 2-inch wide rings if desired). Bake 8-10 minutes.</li> </ol><p><em>Watch more pastry demos on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLp53hk7Xhp_oIrnTFJS3Xs_qrk500sW_g" target="_blank">YouTube @iceculinary</a>, and explore studying with Chef Kathryn in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/career-programs/school-pastry-baking-arts" target="_blank">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts.</a></em></p> Culinary Technique Pastry Arts Baking Arts Cookies Recipe ICE Instructors Video <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-10221" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1611947846"></mark> <footer> </footer> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/10221#comment-10221" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Stand mixer, no.im </a></h3> <p>Submitted by Karen Swaine on <span>December 8, 2020 6:57pm</span></p> <p>I'm rather annoyed by all these recipes calling for a stand mixer. Cookies were around long before there were stand mixers. I'm never going to buy one and I'd like to know the suggested method for those of us without one. Small electric hand held beater? Wooden spoon?</p> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=10221&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="BLLc6PUgbCnwu3aIV1Vwa-TbZ3LDd2rOE_oxzIqLTMM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <div class="indented"><article data-comment-user-id="15186" id="comment-10611" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1611949271"></mark> <footer> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/10221#comment-10221" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Stand mixer, no.im </a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Karen Swaine (not verified)</span></p> </footer> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/10611#comment-10611" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">From Chef Kathryn</a></h3> <p>Submitted by aday on <span>January 29, 2021 2:41pm</span></p> <p>A stand mixer is helpful if the batch is a big size, but certainly for 1 to 2-egg-size mixes, by hand with a spoon or with a handheld mixer works well.</p> <p>It is more critically important to bring your ingredients to room temperature if mixing completely by hand, or it will be very difficult to incorporate the egg into the butter. If your butter and eggs are room temperature, it is easy to cream them by hand in a bowl. A wooden spoon is probably the easiest to get the butter soft and fluffy with the sugar. If you whisk your egg and add it in slowly, that works fine, but if it starts to look wet or clumpy (a broken emulsion), then beat the mixture a bit longer before adding more egg to allow it to incorporate better.</p> <p>A handheld mixer also works fine if that's what you have. Some people might not like vigorously mixing with a wooden spoon and would therefore prefer a handheld mixer.</p> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=10611&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="Al-3E7CKnLkH-RomFa6nmzBjLByyITDHEQWFm9V5rbI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> </div> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=21846&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="IH1323mudqnsex8UaJ5fv59to6fBWzM1wKeZJpj0hnQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Fri, 04 Dec 2020 17:42:36 +0000 aday 21846 at https://www.ice.edu José Avillez's Red Shrimp Recipe https://www.ice.edu/blog/jose-avillez-belcanto-lisbon <span>José Avillez&#039;s Red Shrimp Recipe</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Mon, 11/16/2020 - 16:31</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/red%20shrimp%20header.jpg?itok=SvbQsqq1 Photo by BoaOnda Lisbon&#039;s leading chef demonstrated the signature dish for ICE students and alumni on YouTube Live. <time datetime="2020-11-19T12:00:00Z">November 19, 2020</time> Ashley Day — Content Director <p>The chef of Lisbon's first two-Michelin-starred restaurant, Belcanto, shared his approach to showcasing Portugal's cuisine.</p> <p>José Avillez advised the importance of understanding ingredients, techniques, Portuguese culture and classic French cuisine before creating and imparting one's identity to the cuisine.</p> <p>His signature shrimp and its head with rosemary "ashes" is inspired by the traditional way to cook locally caught seafood over charcoal in Portugal, and the chef said local ingredients are so vital to the cuisine that he was arrested in Canada and Brazil trying to fly with Portuguese products. Today, he sends three flights a week to deliver ingredients from Portugal to his restaurant in Dubai.</p> <p>"Even the water makes a difference," he said of the giant red shrimp, called <em>carabineiro</em>, from the Atlantic. "You have the sweetness, saltiness, all this umami flavor to transport you to the Portuguese seas."</p> <p>"There are a few ingredients and products that we almost don’t touch, and we only cook them to perfection with some special seasonings to promote the flavor to make us travel to certain times of our childhood, and this dish is all about that," he mused while showing us the shrimp body and head that have to be delicately prepared after a day of blending and smoking the rosemary powder. "It’s about amazing Portuguese ingredients with what I think is a perfect cooking technique with these ashes that bring all this flavor from the charcoal that we are used to since we were kids from grilling seafood, fish, even from our grilled chicken piri piri. It’s that smokiness that you bring here."</p> <p>Watch the recording of the complete three-dish demo and get the recipe below.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/u9ynaqXIYZI?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h2>Grilled Giant Red Shrimp with Rosemary Ashes</h2> <p><em>Yields 4 servings</em></p> <h5>Giant Red Shrimp and Giant Red Shrimp Butter</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>4 un. giant red shrimp</li> <li>2 giant red shrimp heads</li> <li>Unsalted butter (pomade), as needed</li> <li>Salt, as needed</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>With a knife, separate the head from the body of each red shrimp.</li> <li>Peel the shrimp and use tweezers to remove the vein.</li> <li>Keep the meat in the fridge, in a lined tray, covered with absorbent paper.</li> <li>Scoop out the heads and keep the content in the fridge, in a lined tray, covered with absorbent paper.</li> <li>Scoop out the two other heads, blend the content with a hand blender and sieve through a fine-mesh sieve.</li> <li>Weigh and add equal amount of unsalted butter (at room temperature).</li> <li>Set aside in the fridge.</li> </ol><h5>Ashes</h5> <ul><li>500 milliliters water</li> <li>125 carolino rice (native short grain variety low in amylose)</li> <li>15 grams cuttlefish ink</li> <li>250 milliliters peanut oil</li> <li>Sea salt, as needed</li> <li>Maltodextrin, as needed</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Cook the rice in unsalted water in a medium-sized saucepan, uncovered, over low heat, for 2 hours.</li> <li>Add the cuttlefish ink, combine, and cook for 20 minutes.</li> <li>Drain the rice through a fine-mesh sieve, discard the liquid, and mash the rice in a food processor.</li> <li>Lay the rice on an oven tray lined with Silpat and keep it in the food warmer to 70 C until completely dehydrated.</li> <li>Break into regular pieces.</li> <li>Fry the pieces of dehydrated rice in hot peanut oil (200 C) for 5 minutes until puffed.</li> <li>Take out of the warmer, let drain in a tray well lined with absorbent paper and try to absorb as much grease as possible.</li> <li>Grind the fried rice pieces in a processor at medium speed until left with a powder.</li> <li>Add smoked salt and maltodextrin as needed.</li> <li>Set aside in the warmer or at room temperature.</li> </ol><h5>Rosemary</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>4 twigs fresh rosemary</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Break the rosemary twigs to match the giant red shrimp in length.</li> </ol><h5>To Finish</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>1 head giant red shrimp</li> <li>1 rosemary twig</li> <li>1 giant red shrimp</li> <li>1 teaspoon giant red shrimp butter</li> <li>Virgin olive oil, as needed</li> </ul> <ol><li>Sear both sides of the head in a very hot nonstick frying pan with a dash of olive oil.</li> <li>Lay the giant red shrimp in a stainless-steel tray or plate, pour a dash of olive oil over it and top with the rosemary twig.</li> <li>Finish cooking (on both sides) in the salamander.</li> </ol><h5>Plating</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>1 head giant red shrimp</li> <li>1 giant red shrimp</li> <li>1 teaspoon giant red shrimp butter</li> <li>2 teaspoons rosemary ashes</li> <li>Smoked fleur de sel, as needed</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Lay the giant shrimp and its head on the center of the plate.</li> <li>Season the giant red shrimp with smoked fleur de sel.</li> <li>Pour 1 tsp of giant red shrimp butter over the giant red shrimp.</li> <li>Spread the ashes over the shrimp.</li> <li>Serve immediately.</li> </ol><p><em>Watch more Elite Chef demos on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLp53hk7Xhp_riwZOTd-w3BEPjqSheGW0j" target="_blank">YouTube @iceculinary</a>.</em></p> Elite Chefs Fish &amp; Seafood Recipe Video Global Cuisine Cooking <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=21761&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="yqYv7ToHBxQBsJL5HE3g8-qMfr58ieHbzweSH5f-F_M"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Mon, 16 Nov 2020 21:31:37 +0000 aday 21761 at https://www.ice.edu Chef Barry's Balsamic Fluid Gel https://www.ice.edu/blog/balsamic-vinegar-fluid-gel <span>Chef Barry&#039;s Balsamic Fluid Gel</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/23/2020 - 12:02</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/balsamic%20gel%20header.jpg?itok=gGE1vmjj A twist on tradition with a picture-perfect pastry. <time datetime="2020-01-23T12:00:00Z">January 23, 2020</time> Barry Tonkinson — Director of Culinary Research and Development <p>Chef Barry Tonkinson bakes a classic combination of flavors — fig and goat cheese — inside a feuillete case with a balsamic fluid gel for pops of acidity.</p> <p>This hydrocolloid has the correct viscosity when it forms a teardrop shape that’s bulbous at the bottom. Pipe the fluid gel atop a rich puff pastry for more of an impact than the typical drizzle of balsamic.</p> <p>Watch Chef Barry demonstrate the technique and get his complete recipe below.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qt09fImdJ7w?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h5>Balsamic Fluid Gel</h5> <ul><li>300 grams Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> <li>3 grams agar agar</li> </ul> <ol><li>Setup sauce pan with probe attachment on Polyscience control freak</li> <li>Add balsamic, sprinkle with agar agar. Set probe to 92 C/198 F. Once temperature is reached, hold for 3 minutes.</li> <li>Remove from heat. Place into a container. Chill until set like a jelly.</li> <li>Once set, place jelly in Vita-Prep. Blend. Once a vortex has been created, sprinkle in xantham gum to create a thick and smooth fluid gel.</li> <li>Funnel into a squeeze bottle for use.</li> </ol><h5>Feuillette Case</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>1 sheet puff pastry</li> <li>2 egg yolk</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Cut two 4-inch circles using a fluted pastry cutter.</li> <li>Cut another 3-inch circle in the center of one.</li> <li>Discard the center piece of pastry.</li> <li>Dock the complete circle and brush the edge with egg wash.</li> <li>Place the remaining ring of puff pastry on top.</li> <li>Place onto a piece of parchment and brush well with egg yolk.</li> <li>Bake in a preheated oven at 400 F until risen, brown and crisp.</li> </ol><h5>Mission Fig Jam</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>260 grams mission figs, diced</li> <li>50 grams sugar</li> <li>50 grams water</li> <li>60 grams lemon juice</li> <li>1 piece dried orange peel</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Place diced mission figs, water, orange peel, sugar and lemon juice in a saucepan.</li> <li>Place on medium heat, stirring frequently.</li> <li>Cook down to a thick, glossy jam.</li> <li>Remove orange peel. Leave to cool.</li> </ol><h5>To Assemble</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>3 mission figs, diced</li> <li>60 grams crumbled Crottin de Chavignol cheese</li> <li>Picked lemon thyme</li> <li>Sorrel leaves</li> <li>Fig jam</li> <li>Balsamic fluid gel</li> <li>Feuillette case</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>In the base of the feuillette case, spoon in a half-inch-thick layer of fig jam.</li> <li>Add diced mission figs and cheese.</li> <li>Sprinkle with lemon thyme.</li> <li>Bake at 135 C/275 F for 5 minutes until warm.</li> <li>Top with piped fluid gel and sorrel leaves.</li> </ol><p><em>Study with Chef Barry in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" target="_blank">ICE's Culinary Arts program.</a></em></p> Culinary Arts Recipe ICE Instructors Video Partners Culinary Technique <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=16321&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="hVrsk9cGYDUPl7PqpgAxqMrVPNwt8R4F_Fu97tajoPc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Thu, 23 Jan 2020 17:02:50 +0000 aday 16321 at https://www.ice.edu The Key Component to Any Marinade https://www.ice.edu/blog/balsamic-marinades-for-vegetables-grains-meat <span>The Key Component to Any Marinade</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/14/2020 - 12:02</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/marinade%20header.jpg?itok=jscmH3Ma Whatever the recipe, marinades always call for balsamic. <time datetime="2020-01-16T12:00:00Z">January 16, 2020</time> Richard LaMarita — Chef-Instructor, Health-Supportive Culinary Arts <p>Health-Supportive Culinary Arts Chef-Instructor Rich LaMarita incorporates Balsamic Vinegar of Modena into three recipes for marinades that are complex with depth of flavor, acidity and an element of sweetness.</p> <p>Marinades tenderize and preserve protein, add a rich component to grain dishes and provide layers of flavor with vegetables. Timing and aging are important factors to consider, and Chef Rich demonstrates how to approach marinating three dishes in the video and recipes below.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/69nHkvoKIuI?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h5>Marinated Skirt Steak</h5> <p><em>Yields 6 servings</em></p> <ul><li>2 pounds skirt steak</li> <li>3 garlic cloves, crushed</li> <li>1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>4 tablespoons Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> <li>1 tablespoon Dijon mustard</li> <li>1 teaspoon shoyu</li> <li>1 teaspoon lemon juice</li> <li>1 lemon, in wedges</li> <li>1/2 teaspoon black pepper</li> </ul> <ol><li>Rub garlic on the steak. Place steak in a dish with olive oil, balsamic, Dijon, shoyu and lemon juice. Let steak sit in marinade for 3–4 hours. Prepare a grill.</li> <li>Season steaks with salt. Grill steaks on high heat to desired doneness, internal temperature should be 125 F, about 2–3 minutes per side for rare.</li> <li>Let steaks stand on cutting board for 5 minutes. Cut steaks on angle, against the grain, into 1/4-inch slices.</li> </ol><h5>Sweet-Sour Marinade for Vegetables</h5> <p><em>Yields 6-8 servings</em></p> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>1/2 cup Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> <li>1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>1/4 cup pineapple juice, reduced to 1/8 cup</li> <li>1 tablespoon brown sugar</li> <li>2 garlic cloves, crushed</li> <li>1 teaspoon red pepper flakes</li> <li>1 teaspoon tamari</li> <li>3 portobello mushrooms, gills removed</li> <li>2 red onions, quartered</li> <li>3 red peppers, halved and seeded</li> <li>3 zucchini, cut 1/2-inch on diagonal</li> <li>2 eggplant, sliced 1/2-inch on diagonal</li> <li>2 tablespoons Aged Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Prepare a grill. Combine marinade ingredients in a bowl. Mix well.</li> <li>Toss vegetables in marinade and let them sit for a few minutes only.</li> <li>Take vegetables from marinade and season with salt and pepper. Grill until vegetables are done but still retain some crisp.</li> <li>Drizzle veggies with aged balsamic.</li> </ol><h5>Three Grains with Garlic Balsamic Marinade</h5> <p><em>Yields 4-6 servings</em></p> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>7 roasted garlic cloves</li> <li>2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil (1)</li> <li>1/3 cup Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> <li>2 tablespoons red onion</li> <li>1 tablespoon Dijon mustard</li> <li>1 teaspoon light brown sugar</li> <li>1/2 cup bulgur</li> <li>1/2 cup quinoa</li> <li>1/2 cup millet</li> <li>2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (2)</li> <li>3 cups water</li> <li>1 cup fava beans</li> <li>2 red bell peppers</li> <li>3 celery stalks, chopped</li> <li>1/2 cup currants</li> <li>1/4 cup parsley, chopped</li> <li>1 tablespoon fresh thyme</li> <li>1 teaspoon fresh dill</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>In a blender, combine garlic and olive oil (1) with balsamic, red onion, mustard and sugar. Blend for a few seconds. Set aside.</li> <li>Saute the grains briefly in olive oil (2). Cook in water until absorbed. While the grains are still warm, combine with the garlic balsamic vinaigrette. Set aside to cool.</li> <li>Blanch the fava beans. Mix the fava beans, peppers, celery, currants, parsley, thyme and dill. Toss with the grains.</li> </ol><p><em>Learn more about Balsamic Vinegar of Modena, and study with Chef Rich in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/health-supportive-culinary-arts-info" target="_blank">Health-Supportive Culinary Arts.</a> </em></p> Ingredient Exploration Recipe Video ICE Instructors Partners <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=16286&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="kOYOdxYq3uChYZe2tqxTjh1AISK524UTNDMT1QW0-XU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 14 Jan 2020 17:02:58 +0000 aday 16286 at https://www.ice.edu Elevate Cheesecake with Balsamic Glaze and Spun Sugar https://www.ice.edu/blog/balsamic-glaze-and-spun-sugar <span>Elevate Cheesecake with Balsamic Glaze and Spun Sugar</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Wed, 01/08/2020 - 14:41</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/spun%20sugar%20header.jpg?itok=xqdRvIIw Pastry Chef Rory Macdonald turns a classic dessert into an elegant dish with Balsamic Vinegar of Modena. <time datetime="2020-01-10T12:00:00Z">January 10, 2020</time> Rory Macdonald — ICE Chef <p>Balsamic Vinegar of Modena can melt in your mouth and add an element of surprise and delight to a pastry in the form of spun sugar.</p> <p>Chef Rory Macdonald tops his mini cheesecakes with a glaze combining cherry puree and balsamic. The flavors marry beautifully and he adds a touch of creativity and ingenuity with his slinky-like spun sugar. Using a tube attachment on an electric screwdriver, he spins a balsamic-isomalt mixture into thin, golden cylinders to delicately top each cake.</p> <p>Watch the video for Chef Rory's sweet technique and get two recipes below.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AlgasQRjPBE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h5>Cherry and Balsamic Glaze</h5> <ul><li>12 sheeted gelatin</li> <li>400 grams Morello cherry puree</li> <li>100 grams Balsamic Vinegar of modena</li> <li>120 grams sugar (1)</li> <li>50 grams glucose</li> <li>200 grams sugar (2)</li> <li>8 grams pectin</li> <li>6 grams citric acid</li> <li>10 grams water</li> </ul> <ol><li>Boil puree, glucose and 120 grams sugar (1).</li> <li>Whisk pectin and 200 grams sugar (2) together.</li> <li>Slowly whisk in pectin and sugar mix so there are no lumps. Whisk for 1 minute.</li> <li>Add citric acid and water.</li> <li>Add bloomed gelatin sheets followed by balsamic, whisk until combined.</li> <li>Cool slightly to 40 C and glaze.</li> </ol><h5>Spun Sugar</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>200 grams isomalt</li> <li>80 grams Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Place the isomalt in a small saucepan and begin to melt (without water) over low heat. Avoid stirring if possible.</li> <li>The isomalt will turn to liquid and begin to bubble, gradually bring up to 135 C.</li> <li>Add the balsamic (beware it will bubble and react when added), stir with a heatproof spatula and continue to cook for 1 minute.</li> <li>Do not overcook at this stage as the vinegar will burn and leave a bad aftertaste.</li> <li>Remove from heat and allow to cool until the isomalt/vinegar mix has started to set.</li> <li>Using a teaspoon, gradually drop this over the moving screwdriver to create the thin spiral. Allow to cool for around a minute before removing from the attachment.</li> <li>Use immediately or store in an airtight container with silica gel to remove any moisture.</li> </ol><p><em>Learn more about <a href="https://www.ice.edu/partner-with-ice/balsamic-vinegar-modena">Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</a> and <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" target="_blank">ICE's Pastry &amp; Baking Arts program.</a> </em></p> Cake Pastry Arts Recipe Sugar Art Video Partners ICE Chef <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-7121" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1588966589"></mark> <footer> </footer> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/7121#comment-7121" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Video</a></h3> <p>Submitted by Mark on <span>January 19, 2020 12:35pm</span></p> <p>Nice concept.</p> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=7121&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="-QbrrggYePtDoInLMtkL8PYQqK6cOdLPLgu66HKFGXg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=16261&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="dMhtROKiNCmyEHPNMQm4FGNzAr2juBhpPQNCUwfhqqc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Wed, 08 Jan 2020 19:41:40 +0000 aday 16261 at https://www.ice.edu Chef Celine's Refreshing Shrub Recipes https://www.ice.edu/blog/balsamic-vinegar-shrubs <span>Chef Celine&#039;s Refreshing Shrub Recipes</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/07/2020 - 11:49</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/shrubs%20header.jpg?itok=Tf6x4QuR ICE&#039;s Director of Nutrition shares the benefits of shrubs and three recipes with Balsamic Vinegar of Modena. <time datetime="2020-01-07T12:00:00Z">January 7, 2020</time> Celine Beitchman — Director of Nutrition <p>Shrubs combine a little bit of vinegar with a lot of water and any variety of flavors. Here, Chef Celine Beitchman chooses red fruit, herbs and vanilla that pair well with Balsamic Vinegar of Modena.</p> <p>The hydrating beverage is a flavorful way to incorporate more water into one's diet and balsamic offers a sweet alternative to sugar. Use sparkling water for an effervescent nonalcoholic drink or sparkling wine for a spritz, and use your imagination and what's seasonal to customize your variation. Watch Chef Celine explain more about the ancient elixir and incorporate flowers from <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/explore-ice/hydroponic-garden" target="_blank">ICE's hydroponic garden</a> in her three recipes, detailed below.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/53on-jBRy7k?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h5>Aged Balsamic Shrub</h5> <p><em>Yields 1-2 servings, nonalcoholic</em></p> <ul><li>1/8 ounce (2-3 sprigs, 8-10 leaves) aromatic herbs or edible flowers (oxalis, basil, mint, thyme, dianthus)</li> <li>8 ounces (1 cup) filtered water</li> <li>1/4-1/2 ounce (1 1/2-3 teaspoons) Aged Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> <li>1-2 herb springs or edible flowers for garnish</li> </ul><h3>Equipment</h3> <ul><li>1 pint glass (glass or metal)</li> <li>1 muddler</li> <li>1 16-ounce measuring cup</li> <li>1 4-ounce measuring cup</li> <li>1 cocktail strainer</li> <li>1-2 serving glasses</li> <li>1 long-handled stirring spoon</li> </ul> <ol><li>Add herbs or flowers to pint glass with two ounces of water and muddle herbs/flowers gently.</li> <li>Pour in remaining water and vinegar, stir and strain into serving glass(es.</li> <li>Garnish with herb spring or flowers and serve immediately.</li> </ol><p>Note: Herbs and edible flowers are highly perishable. Wash immediately before using. Keep attached to roots where possible and refrigerate, store wrapped in damp paper towels for up to three days.</p> <h5>Spiked Balsamic Shrubs</h5> <p><em>Yields 4 servings</em></p> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>1 ounce (2 tablespoons) Aged Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> <li>1 vanilla bean, split</li> <li>16 ounces Prosecco, Cava or Champagne</li> <li>4 sprigs rosemary</li> </ul><h3>Equipment</h3> <ul><li>1 small pot</li> <li>1 small rubber spatula</li> <li>1 mesh bar strainer</li> <li>1 small cutting board</li> <li>1 paring knife</li> <li>1 16-ounce measuring cup</li> <li>1 4-ounce measuring cup</li> <li>1 medium metal bowl</li> <li>1 4-cup bain-marie</li> <li>2-4 cups ice for ice bath</li> <li>4 serving glasses (Champagne flutes or martini-style)</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Scald balsamic in a small pot and remove from heat. Add in vanilla bean seeds and gently stir. Let sit five minutes. Cool completely in ice bath or on the counter until ready to use. Strain as desired.</li> <li>Divide vanilla-infused balsamic between two Champagne flutes or martini glasses.</li> <li>Top each with bubbly and a spring of rosemary.</li> <li>Serve immediately.</li> </ol><h5>Fizzy, Fruity Balsamic Shrub</h5> <p><em>Yields 1-2 servings</em></p> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>2 ounces fresh fruit (figs, cherries or strawberries)</li> <li>2 ounces (1/4 cup) filtered water</li> <li>1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) Aged Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</li> <li>Ice cubes, as needed</li> <li>6 ounces seltzer</li> <li>2 sprigs fresh mint (preferably with flower buds)</li> <li>Fresh fruit for garnish (1 fig, 4 cherries or 2 strawberries)</li> </ul><h3>Equipment</h3> <ul><li>1 pint glass (glass or metal)</li> <li>1 muddler</li> <li>1 16-ounce measuring cup</li> <li>1 4-ounce measuring cup</li> <li>1 mesh cocktail strainer</li> <li>1 small rubber spatula</li> <li>1-2 serving rocks glasses</li> <li>1 long-handled stirring spoon</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Add fruit to pint glass with two ounces of water and muddle. Add vinegar and muddle again to combine flavors. Press mixture through mesh strainer. (Alternately mix everything in a blender or with an immersion/wand blender for 2-3 minutes and strain through mesh strainer).</li> <li>Divide fruited vinegar mixture into serving glass(es), add ice and top with seltzer.</li> <li>Garnish with mint and fresh fruit, and serve immediately.</li> </ol><p><em>Learn more about <a href="https://www.ice.edu/partner-with-ice/balsamic-vinegar-modena" target="_blank">Balsamic Vinegar of Modena</a> and <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://recreational.ice.edu/Home/WineAndBeverages" target="_blank">beverage classes at ICE.</a> </em></p> Beverage Healthy Plant-Based Recipe Video Partners <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=16256&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="jOJXcW8hi0DYHRhl5cTY_ZimlhtK63uyscMTLCJF3JU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 07 Jan 2020 16:49:39 +0000 aday 16256 at https://www.ice.edu How to Buy Balsamic Vinegar https://www.ice.edu/blog/authentic-balsamic-vinegar <span>How to Buy Balsamic Vinegar</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/02/2020 - 11:23</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/buying%20balsamic%20header.jpg?itok=qbLRWUpY Institute of Culinary Education chefs share what to look for when selecting a balsamic vinegar. <time datetime="2020-01-03T12:00:00Z">January 3, 2020</time> ICE Staff <p>ICE Chef Rory Macdonald, Director of Nutrition Celine Beitchman, Director of Culinary Research and Development Barry Tonkinson and Health-Supportive Culinary Arts Chef-Instructor Rich LaMarita advise cooks of all levels on balsamic vinegar authenticity, certification and quality.</p> <p>Here are their pro tips on identifying the age, aroma, color and label of the best balsamic for your cooking.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/p1IdgDDGAtk?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <p><em>Get these chefs' recipes for using authentic <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/partner-with-ice/balsamic-vinegar-modena" target="_blank">Balsamic Vinegar of Modena.</a></em></p> Ingredient Exploration Chefs ICE Chef ICE Instructors Cooking Video Partners <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=16231&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="BgOaQ_ggY1-zXe0t2TmecatHCDGWmR3PqMq9fJq64no"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Thu, 02 Jan 2020 16:23:14 +0000 aday 16231 at https://www.ice.edu My Culinary Voice: Tim Hollingsworth https://www.ice.edu/blog/tim-hollingsworth-culinary-voice <span>My Culinary Voice: Tim Hollingsworth</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Mon, 10/14/2019 - 11:28</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/tim%20hollingsworth%20header.jpg?itok=2g9zgDl6 &quot;I really like to focus and challenge myself.&quot; <time datetime="2019-10-14T12:00:00Z">October 14, 2019</time> ICE Staff <p>The chef and owner of Los Angeles restaurants Otium, C.J. Boyd’s Fried Chicken and Free Play at The Fields LA, shares his approach as he progresses his culinary career.</p> <p>Chef Tim gained experience throughout 12 years at The French Laundry before working abroad in Europe, Lebanon and South Korea. He represented the U.S. in the international Bocuse d'Or competition in 2009, was recognized as a rising star chef by the San Francisco Chronicle and James Beard Awards in 2010, and opened Otium in 2015.</p> <p>Most recently, Chef Tim won "The Final Table" on Netflix and visited our Los Angeles campus to share career advice with aspiring chefs and restaurateurs. Here, he shares how the food he grew up with interplays with his fine dining experience.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VPnUPBIzWDU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <p><em>Read more from <a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/timothy-hollingsworth-restaurant-management">Chef Tim's guest lecture</a> and explore your own <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" target="_blank">culinary career in L.A.</a></em></p> Chefs My Culinary Voice Video Los Angeles <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=15861&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="r92dAmLj0wiUv1F8LmNfHRom31qpOsCAR6OlKzjP-5w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Mon, 14 Oct 2019 15:28:56 +0000 aday 15861 at https://www.ice.edu