Business of Food https://www.ice.edu/ en Jitlada Chef Sugar Sungkamee on Restaurant Management https://www.ice.edu/blog/jitlada-chef-sugar-sungkamee <span>Jitlada Chef Sugar Sungkamee on Restaurant Management</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Tue, 04/06/2021 - 17:13</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Jitlada%20group%20at%20ICE%20header.jpg?itok=PhO3QQa9 Jitlada team Jazz Singsanong and Sugar Sungkamee visited ICE in 2019. Sugar shares how she&#039;s using her culinary management education from ICE, even after restaurant experience and a MBA. <time datetime="2021-04-07T12:00:00Z">April 7, 2021</time> Kiri Tannenbaum — Director of Culinary Relations <p>Jitlada is one of those quintessential Los Angeles restaurants — a part of the city’s rich immigrant identity, beloved by many (especially the late LA Times critic, Jonathan Gold) and located in an unassuming spot. Like many restaurants spread across Los Angeles’ strip malls, Jitlada is also family-run.</p> <p>Helmed by Jazz Singsanong and her niece, Sugar, the restaurant was founded by Sugar’s father Suthiporn “Tui” Sungkamee, who passed away in 2017. Sugar strives to carry on the family’s restaurant legacy, also owns Spicy Sugar in Long Beach, and recently completed her diploma in <a href="https://www.ice.edu/losangeles/career-programs/restaurant-culinary-management">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management at ICE</a>. Here's her story from dad’s kitchen helper to owner-operator.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Jitlada family and Jonathan Gold" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Jitlada%20family%20and%20Jonathan%20Gold.jpg" /><figcaption>The family behind Jitlada and Jonathan Gold</figcaption></figure><p><strong>How did Jitlada come about?</strong></p> <p>My dad owned restaurants all his life and also in Thailand. He liked to do things his way. When doing things at other restaurants they would say that it was “too spicy” and the flavors “too foreign” for American palates. He was used to being the boss.</p> <p>Then, the old owners of Jitlada knew my dad and they wanted to sell it. They offered to lease it, my dad took it over, and I helped him open it. I was 15 at the time. I had been helping him ever since, all through high school.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Sugar and her dad" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Sugar%20and%20dad%20web.jpg" /><figcaption>Sugar and her father Suthiporn “Tui” Sungkamee</figcaption></figure><p><strong>What did you learn from your father?</strong></p> <p>I never went to formal cooking school, but I learned all my cooking from my dad. Ever since I was a baby, he wanted me to be a little Thai Martha Stewart. We spent a lot of time in the kitchen together. He taught the recipes to me at night when everyone [on the kitchen staff] was gone.</p> <p>My dad also taught me to pick out fresh seafood and produce from the market in downtown LA. There are a few markets we go to in Monterrey Park. I just picked up some live crabs today!</p> <p><strong>What led you to enroll in the Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management program at ICE after earning your MBA?</strong></p> <p>I went to ICE because our restaurant is family-run — uncles, cousins, aunties. I wanted to go to ICE to learn a system. What I learned in business school is different than how to run a small business and especially a small restaurant business.</p> <p><strong>What are the most important takeaways from your ICE education?</strong></p> <p>Reading financials. A lot of mom-and-pop small businesses don’t read that. They have a bookkeeper and enough to buy tomorrow’s groceries, they don’t understand budgeting. And marketing: In business school, they teach you how to work in a large corporation, which is very different. We learned social media, PR and how to market your restaurant business.</p> <p>Before COVID-19, we never had delivery. So now we have Grubhub, DoorDash, UberEats. From the class, I learned to work on our website and to make our website more interesting, what people look for and how to make our menu available. We were stuck in the ‘90s before. We’re slowly getting there and now we’re also selling gift cards, t-shirts and bottled sauce.</p> <p><strong>What did you like most about the management program at ICE?</strong></p> <p>I loved my instructor, Mishel LeDoux. She really inspired me to work on my business every day. She also inspired me to give better customer service – in general, understanding what hospitality is and what that means and really seeing what the customer needs. Being more observant and knowing what they like and making adjustments to your business. To cater to them, to make them feel special when they come in — all the little details.</p> <blockquote> <p>Remembering the details about a guest goes a long way.</p> </blockquote> <figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Sugar in a virtual class with Dean of Restaurant and Hospitality Management Mishel LeDoux" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Sugar's%20class%20web.jpg" /><figcaption>Sugar in a virtual class with Dean of Restaurant and Hospitality Management Mishel LeDoux</figcaption></figure><p><strong>What impact do you think this education will have on you and your business in the long-run?</strong></p> <p>Well, first and foremost, it does make me a more confident operator. I feel like I got formal training, specific to what I do. I was already working in the restaurant business and have experience in it. I feel like I got more out of it because I applied a real-world perspective.</p> <p>Second, giving me new ideas. Every class I would think, <em>Oh crap, oh my God, I haven’t done that yet!</em> Mishel taught me inventory — we don’t do inventory. I don’t know how much beef we have in there! I never thought I could get that done by the end of the month. Everything I learned was added to my list of things to do and things I can eventually get to in order to better my business.</p> <p>Also with the POS, all the details we need to look at sales per person, incentives to give my employees and how to deal with that. If I never went to ICE there would be no one to tell me these details.</p> <p><strong>What is next for Jitlada?</strong></p> <p>We are working on reopening after COVID-19 with dine-in and a tasting menu for Jitlada, inspired by Mishel. We want to do new and exciting dishes. We want to meet the customers’ needs. There’s still a lot we have to do. I want to make it more of what people expect it to be. There’s a lot of people that love it and a lot that don’t understand it. I’m working on making Jitlada better and more available.</p> <p><em>Study to operate a restaurant in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/restaurant-culinary-management-info" target="_blank">ICE's management program.</a></em></p> Restaurant Management Restaurants Alumni Los Angeles <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=22811&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="UZVLMFQtM6F56qOE7NV2TuQV6LA7w2jih1kt4o4ET2Q"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 06 Apr 2021 21:13:01 +0000 aday 22811 at https://www.ice.edu Simon Kim on Keeping Cote Afloat https://www.ice.edu/blog/simon-kim-cote-korean-steakhouse <span>Simon Kim on Keeping Cote Afloat</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Wed, 03/24/2021 - 09:55</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Cote%20food%20spread%20header.jpg?itok=wzfavZxn The New York restaurateur pivoted to shipping steak and continued opening a Miami outpost despite COVID-19. <time datetime="2021-03-24T12:00:00Z">March 24, 2021</time> Kiri Tannenbaum — Director of Culinary Relations <p>Simon Kim opened his first outpost of high-end Korean steakhouse, Cote, in Miami in the middle of the greatest challenge this industry has faced — a pandemic. With restrictions, reduced capacities and mandated closures, Simon never stopped pivoting and planning. He shared his tactics for building the business with Institute of Culinary Education students during a recent virtual event.</p> <p>After Simon Kim opened the sleek Korean steakhouse Cote in New York’s Flatiron district in 2017, the accolades streamed in. Within months, the restaurant earned a two-star review from The New York Times, three stars from New York magazine, three stars from Eater and a coveted Michelin star. The following year, GQ called Cote the Best New Restaurant in America. The positive response from critics and diners alike led Simon to contemplate expansion. After carefully considering D.C., Las Vegas and Los Angeles, the restaurateur chose Miami with plans to open in 2020. Then the unfathomable happened — the epidemic arrived in the U.S. We all know what happened after that. One might think a restaurateur with a fine-dining concept would pull the plug on expansion to a new city, but as an eternal optimist, Simon forged ahead.</p> <p>In February, we hosted the restaurateur and philanthropist to hear how he strategized through the circumstances. Just five days after opening his latest location, he shared advice on pivots, plans and persistence in the midst of challenging times.</p> <p><strong>On the original Cote concept:</strong></p> <p>Cote is a Korean steakhouse. Half of me is Korean barbecue, and as I grew up in New York, half of me is the classic American steakhouse. Korean steakhouse is what I am. You can expect all the fun and fire of a barbecue and get silly and unpretentious but with the most excellent beef. Beef is king. We procure the best beef, even compared to the most prestigious steakhouses. On top of that, we’ve thrown in 1,200 labels of wine, an amazing cocktail list and ambiance. We try to procure the best of both worlds.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Simon Kim and Cote's executive chef with the steak cart" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Simon%20and%20Chef%20with%20Cote%20Cart_0.jpg" /><figcaption>Photo by Gary He</figcaption></figure><p><strong>On adding revenue streams:</strong></p> <p>The government basically closed down restaurants, but the industry-specific restrictions did not come with industry-specific relief. My managers, my vice presidents, they all have children, dependents and payments, and unemployment was insufficient to sustain life, not only in NYC but anywhere.</p> <p>If all want to survive, the only way is by bringing in more revenue. So we got together and brainstormed ideas of what we can do to make that happen. In April of 2020, regulars were leaving New York and calling us for a box of steak. We had a dry-aging room filled with steak, so we cut them up, put them in a package with our vegetables, and we called it our Steak Care Package. Then Goldbelly approached us — this steak care package is loved by everyone, and so one month later we were sending steak to Hawaii. Now our business volume on Goldbelly is significant.</p> <p><strong>On translating fine dining to takeout:</strong></p> <p>We are a Michelin-starred steakhouse. How do you transition from our grilling meat to eating at home? We focused on small details on making a more cared-for takeout. When you cook and rest the meat, cut and put into a container, what happens is the purge – what looks like blood – it all seeps out. When it gets to someone’s house, it is resting in that unappetizing liquid. So, we decided to get a bunch of Wonder bread and layer the bottom of the steak with two pieces of Wonder bread which provides a plush place so it doesn’t wobble around and all the liquid is absorbed into the bread. The bread is not something Cote recommends eating, but our customers enjoyed eating it as well. We purchased really nice pink envelopes for our utensils, which we put a little note inside from us. There’s a sense of refinement that we put into our service and we tried our best to put that same care into our takeaway and delivery. We really took a lot of care.</p> <p><strong>On managing costs:</strong></p> <p>When we decided to pivot, we put a lot of thought into it. It was a pandemic, it’s not a time to make money, rather it’s a time to survive. We initially called all of our vendors and told them we were going into delivery, but clearly, we’re not going to be able to pay you what we paid before. My goal was never to make money, as long as I can sustain and feed people – so that same interest had to be aligned with the vendors. I called my steak vendor and said, charge me the rock-bottom price you can. We were able to provide the same quality at a fraction of the cost.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Cote steak aging" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Cote%20steak%20web%20credit%20Naho%20Kubota.jpg" /><figcaption>Photo by Naho Kubota</figcaption></figure><p><strong>On the challenge of opening in Miami:</strong></p> <p>I was still raising capital when COVID-19 happened. I was halfway funded. When literally every restaurant is shut down, how do you get investors? It’s like, "Hey, my restaurant is closed, and it looks like it’s going to be a year or so..." There were many sleepless nights and desperate phone calls. But, once again, if you persevere, stay consistent, see through it, don’t give up, and don’t lose confidence in optimism, you can make it happen.</p> <p>Construction was difficult as well. There was a stay-at-home order that delayed everything. I had to negotiate more free rent. As an operator of a small restaurant, you are not really in control to do anything other than work with everyone including landlords, contractors, investors ... by communicating and sharing what’s going on. Be transparent, be firm, but be confident. Every one of them was cooperative. We were able to open the restaurant pretty much on budget. Not too delayed.</p> <p><strong>On finding inspiration in the midst of crisis:</strong></p> <p>I always thought as a restauranteur who came from nothing, I had thick skin and a hard core, but if I look back at myself pre-pandemic, one year ago, I didn’t know anything. I was a softy. The pandemic hardened our shell and made us more shrewd, brave and courageous operators. You know what they say? A calm ocean never produced a great sailor. This super turbulent time allowed us to navigate through with a tiny budget and so many challenges — challenge after challenge — and after a while, you got used to it. Cote was a success from the beginning, but what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger and it inspired me in a way that nothing has ever done. I am extremely grateful to my team who was able to come together and make this ship stronger and better than when it went into the storm.</p> <p><em>Study operational strategies like Simon's in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/losangeles/career-programs/restaurant-culinary-management" target="_blank">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management at ICE.</a></em></p> Guest Lectures Restaurant Management Entrepreneurship Interview <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=22751&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="i_T5KL5fXS4Q1i9tlUGvDXs-oQ7UD0gUV7BF9i_Jcgg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Wed, 24 Mar 2021 13:55:39 +0000 aday 22751 at https://www.ice.edu https://www.ice.edu/blog/simon-kim-cote-korean-steakhouse#comments Public Speaking for Restaurant Professionals https://www.ice.edu/blog/restaurant-management-public-speaking <span>Public Speaking for Restaurant Professionals</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Thu, 02/04/2021 - 13:21</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/public%20speaking%20header.jpg?itok=XDeWn8D2 Chefs Jameeale Arzeno, Michael Jenkins, Adrienne Cheatham, Michael Garrett and Kwame Williams (Culinary, &#039;07) speak to students at ICE. Chefs, managers and owners alike can benefit professionally with comfortability speaking to groups. <time datetime="2021-02-06T12:00:00Z">February 6, 2021</time> Rick Camac — Dean, Restaurant &amp; Hospitality Management <p>The ability to speak well publicly comes into play often in the restaurant industry. Restaurant managers and owners need to represent the venue and often the company anywhere from a community board meeting, public hearing or vendor meeting, to company-wide meetings or a meeting with a team. Speaking comfortably and confidently with conviction, passion and integrity will go a long way toward achieving company and personal professional goals.</p> <p>It’s hard to be a leader in any business without being able to speak well in groups. Better public speakers tend to become leaders more easily and rise through the ranks of organizations quicker. It’s really hard to communicate your points or goals to your teams, venues, company, investors and others without a comfort with public speaking.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Rick Camac" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Rick%20Camac%20web_0.jpg" /><figcaption>Dean of Restaurant &amp; Hospitality Management Rick Camac</figcaption></figure><p>Early on in my career as a restaurateur, I found myself having to speak in front of groups that eventually were in the thousands. Public speaking did not come naturally to me, nor do I believe it does to most of us, and I was forced to confront my issues head-on. Learning how to speak in public should be part of every college or vocational school curriculum. I believe it to be one of the most important things we can learn. And, as is the case with most things, it takes practice. The more you do it, the easier it gets.</p> <p>All things being equal, if two candidates are in contention for a job or a promotion, the one that is comfortable speaking in front of people will likely get the nod. Good public speakers come off with more confidence, and seemingly, more knowledge. By no means does this mean we all need to run for office or aspire to speak in front of thousands or millions. But being comfortable with speaking in front of 10-20 people will likely come up many times in your business career and even your personal life.</p> <p>In Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management classes at ICE, I have students start off with easy subjects for a few minutes, and by the time they are ready to graduate, they are comfortable speaking in front of the class for 20-30 minutes.</p> <p>As with many other interpersonal skills, I think most people have become more comfortable with communicating in other ways, from phone calls to emails and then texts. We all know people that would do anything not to have to communicate directly with anyone. Now, during the pandemic, we have Zoom. The less we have to get in front of others, the less comfortable many of us will be doing so (and the more we’ll resort to other forms of communication).</p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Chef and restaurateur Susan Feniger speaks to ICE students" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/susan%20feniger%20speaking.jpg" /><figcaption>Chef and restaurateur Susan Feniger speaks to ICE students.</figcaption></figure><p>Here are the tips that have helped me to this day.</p> <p>1. <strong>Practice.</strong> If you’re comfortable speaking to one, practice speaking to three. Use family and friends. Talk about topics that you are 100% comfortable with. Talk about your dog or favorite color. Keep growing until the group is a little bigger and the subject is a tad more unfamiliar.</p> <p>2. <strong>Blanking out:</strong> That was my biggest fear. I’d forget what I was about to say. When that happens, just go back to the subject matter. Speak logically and forget your notes and what you tried to memorize. Trying to remember what you memorized is scarier than just speaking from what you know. Try just leaving yourself a few key points to speak to. Start with the subject matter you know well.</p> <p>3. <strong>Knowledge is power.</strong> This is never more true than with speaking. Get to know your material as well as you can. Having knowledge to offer gives you confidence. Know that you have something valuable to say. Before I get in front of a large group, I tell myself I have something to convey that people want to hear. I tell myself that I know more about the subject than anyone in the room. It may not be true, but it gives me confidence.</p> <p>4. <strong>Do not memorize anything.</strong> Then there’s nothing to forget. Know the material well and give yourself bullet points to speak from. Memorization works well for some and is paralyzing for others. That said, do practice your speech often — just don’t try to memorize every word.</p> <p>5. <strong>There's no need to fear failure.</strong> An audience does not want you to fail. Most of the time, showing vulnerability goes a long way toward getting an audience on your side.</p> <p>6. <strong>Make them laugh.</strong> Be self-deprecating. Get them on your side quickly. I usually say something humorous to start just about every speech I make. Get the audience to laugh and you've got them! This may be my best tip and it works well for me. I immediately relax once I get a group to react positively.</p> <p>7. <strong>Be honest.</strong> Be heartfelt and try not to read from a script (that’s what trips many of us up). Be confident about knowing your subject matter and be yourself.</p> <p>8. <strong>Get comfortable and start small.</strong> Once you’re comfortable speaking in front of 12 people, 50 is a breeze. It stops mattering.</p> <p>9. <strong>Focus your attention.</strong> If it helps, take turns looking at one person in the audience and speak to them like it’s a one-on-one conversation. Then, after a minute or so, focus on another. And so on. After a while, you’ll stop doing that and then be able to scan the room as you speak.</p> <p>10. <strong>Hint for online speaking:</strong> I don’t like to see myself on screen when I’m talking (I’m used to that now) so I used to turn my own video off when I spoke. Seeing myself speak made me self-conscious. Now, I don’t care. And, again, concentrate on talking to one person as if there’s no one else in the (virtual) room. Ultimately, you’ll get comfortable with looking up and scanning the room, without even realizing it.</p> <p><em>Hear excerpts from our <a href="https://youtu.be/bXCvE93JSNA" target="_blank">virtual guest speakers</a> in 2020, and study more management skills in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/restaurant-culinary-management-info" target="_blank">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management at ICE.</a></em></p> Business of Food Restaurant Management ICE Instructors <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=22426&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="EbLSzSn4SnYjjVk5nVrx2kto5Ko_8NeoJV-tLNBTJXs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Thu, 04 Feb 2021 18:21:55 +0000 aday 22426 at https://www.ice.edu https://www.ice.edu/blog/restaurant-management-public-speaking#comments Culinary Career Advice from Rick Bayless https://www.ice.edu/blog/rick-bayless-how-to-become-a-chef <span>Culinary Career Advice from Rick Bayless</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/15/2020 - 13:21</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Frontera%20Grill%20header%20GALDONES%20PHOTOGRAPHY%20312.jpg?itok=AMoAByGf Frontera Grill interior photo by Galdones Photography Insights from the Chicago chef and restaurateur&#039;s virtual appearance at ICE. <time datetime="2020-09-15T12:00:00Z">September 15, 2020</time> Ashley Day — Content Director <p>The James Beard Foundation named him Humanitarian of the Year in 2007. He won the first season of “Top Chef Masters” in 2012. Eater called him the most interesting man in the world in 2014, and Bon Appetit called him the unofficial mayor of Chicago in 2015.</p> <p>Chef Rick grew up with an appreciation for regional specialties because his father specialized in Oklahoma barbecue, and he developed expertise in regional Mexican cuisines after relocating to the country for five years to write a cookbook on the topic. He opened Frontera Grill based on that cookbook in 1987 and has expanded to four restaurants on Clark Street throughout 30 years of acclaim, awards and food media appearances, including seven James Beard Awards, nine cookbooks and four Emmy nominations for his PBS series “Mexico – One Plate at a Time,” which is in its 12th season.</p> <p>Here are Rick Bayless’ top tips for aspiring culinary professionals from more than three decades of success.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Chef Rick Bayless" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Rick%20Bayless%20GALDONES%20PHOTOGRAPHY%20web.jpg" /><figcaption>Rick Bayless photo by Galdones Photography</figcaption></figure><p><strong>Keep an Open Mind</strong></p> <p>My motivation for writing a cookbook on regional Mexican cooking was to help show people that the kind of food we call Mexican in the U.S. isn’t really Mexican food, it’s Mexican-American food. And the food that they eat in Mexico, I wanted to show people was more diverse and really, really wonderful. But the only way I could do that was to support myself by being a consultant in a chain of Mexican-American restaurants that had 27 ingredients in the kitchen and I couldn’t add anything else, and I had to make everything from wet burritos to crispy, fried shell tacos, but I did it because they paid me enough to do the other project that I wanted to do. The thing that I learned in all that because I kept an open mind – it was a little hard from time to time – but it taught me a whole lot about how to run a really good restaurant. They had all the systems down.</p> <p><strong>Build a Solid Foundation</strong></p> <p>I worked super hard on that opening menu of Frontera to make sure that it: No. 1 reflected Mexico really well. No. 2 would be dishes that our clientele here, which wasn’t mostly Mexican at the beginning, that they would resonate with in some way, and not be put off by, and were absolutely rock solid in their preparations. After 30 years we still have eight dishes on the menu from that original menu. That’s a huge recommendation on my part: Your opening menu should not be a work in progress. It should be absolutely stuff that you think could be bedrock for you then to grow from and add more stuff to. Get something rock solid to start with because that’s what everyone’s going to know you as. I think that’s been part of our success that I built a good, solid foundation. Then the second thing that’s really important is to constantly change your menu. For us it was really important to build this constant changing thing so that we could stay engaged.</p> <p><strong>Learn the Technique. Respect the Tradition.</strong></p> <p>When you make a real cochinita pibil, and you do it just like they do in Mexico. It’s a real small pig that’s marinated in achiote and then wrapped in banana leaves and cooked slowly traditionally in a wood-fired pit but in most people’s homes it will go in the oven. And then you make all of their accompaniments to go with it exactly right, which most people will tell you that you have to tone it down for the American palate, and then to me you’ve compromised the dish in a way that is not representative of Mexico, and it’s not that good. You have to have all the parts. You have to have the right pickled onions and the right habanero sauce, which can make certain people cry – it made me cry the first time I had it, too. It’s hot but it’s so incredibly flavorful, and if you make it in the traditional way, which is three ingredients treated right, then you’re going to have the most amazing dish. But if you don’t learn the technique and respect the tradition, it’s not going to be a great dish. We do it all right. We get the pigs from a local farmer, all of that.</p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/career-programs/restaurant-and-culinary-management" target="_blank">Build a foundation with a Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management diploma.</a></p> <p><strong>Introduce Something Unknown</strong></p> <p>I have such clarity that I want to represent Mexico really well so if we have a fine dining concept and we have a mid-place concept then I say, what would quick-service be like? And that’s when we opened Xoco. Anything that is inspiring to me in Mexico, I’m inspired to bring back to the U.S. That’s why we spun off from our Xoco place, which really focuses on tortas and caldos, the meal-in-a-bowl soups, and fresh churros. We made a little version of that to do at the airport because we thought it would work out there, and it did so incredibly well. The most successful concept that the airport has ever seen. Who knew that you could do something with Mexican sandwiches? Everybody knows sandwiches, but nobody knows Mexican sandwiches, and they’re not even called sandwiches, they’re called tortas. We decided to do that because everyone and their dog is doing a taqueria now, so I wanted to bring something that’s not known from Mexico.</p> <p><strong>Get to Know Yourself</strong></p> <p>You have to know yourself really well, and I don’t think that that happens the second you start out. It’s always that test by fire and you find out who you really are and what you’re really made out of when you go into business. The clearer you can become on what motivates you and what feels like it’s your thing, what’s expressing in food what you want to express, then do it, but it takes some time to get to know that.</p> <p>I’m a guy who has never ordered a delivery pizza in my life. If I’m going to eat something I want it fresh out of the oven. I’m such a hospitality guy that putting food in a bag, stapling it shut, setting it on a wire shelf and letting somebody come to the other side and take it off – there’s no hospitality there. I like to see people enjoy my food. That was the hardest thing in the world for me to be stuck doing all takeout. I didn’t get any of the feedback I’m used to getting.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Enchiladas at Frontera Grill" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Enchiladas%20de%20la%20Puerta%20web.jpg" /><figcaption>Enchiladas at Frontera Grill</figcaption></figure><p><strong>Know Your Mission</strong></p> <p>I didn’t get into this because I had a business concept, I did this because I was passionate about Mexico and its cuisine, but you’ve got to manage the finances so that you can do the art. If you go out of business, you can’t do the art. I wanted to run our restaurants well but not sacrifice everything to make money.</p> <p>I’m always open to thinking about everything, but I think first and foremost: How will this further our mission? Right now, we don’t have anything going at the airport, and there are people who would plan their layovers in Chicago to get tortas there. For some people that was all they knew about our cuisine: what they got from Tortas Frontera at the airport. Thinking about what we could do to give that some life again, we thought about the ghost kitchen.</p> <p>There’s this place that’s not far from our restaurants that’s ghost kitchens for people. You can have your own unique concept or a brick and mortar someplace else. Now we can say you can get this food that you loved at the airport, and you don’t have to go to the airport to get it anymore [because online ordering for delivery or pickup is now available]. I try to imagine when I think about what the new possible concept is, how would we look doing that concept? What would make it a Frontera concept? Does it really fit?</p> <p><strong>Tell Your Story</strong></p> <p>The hardest thing that we have to do as chefs is to be able to talk to our guests. We express ourselves through our food but there’s a story in every single plate. In the past we’ve had an amazing education for our front of house staff at Frontera to educate the staff on the story behind the dish. They could communicate some of that to our guests, but there is no one better than you as the chef to communicate that. That’s why I always write books because it gives me the opportunity to tell the story behind the dish and help them understand what my inspiration is. I think it’s really important to do that. It’s also really good practice to concisely tell your story and the story of the dishes. Whether it’s cooking demonstrations or guest spots on the lunchtime news in your town, do it. I never said no to anything, I would do it all because I knew it would really give me the practice I needed. The more you talk and tell your story the more comfortable you are with it. It’s always great to have a cookbook and a bunch of TV appearances, but make sure that they really express who you are.</p> <p><em>See <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/events" target="_blank">upcoming guest chefs and culinary experts</a> speaking online, and <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" target="_blank">start your future in food at ICE.</a></em></p> Chefs Restaurant Management Guest Lectures Demos &amp; Lectures Midwest <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=21286&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="PRiakvl1stJLg4sZ7zA9BquG2FsTKjaxOymP1pUxkqQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 15 Sep 2020 17:21:10 +0000 aday 21286 at https://www.ice.edu Are New York Restaurateurs Becoming Their Own Greatest Competitors? https://www.ice.edu/blog/new-york-restaurant-post-pandemic-predictions <span>Are New York Restaurateurs Becoming Their Own Greatest Competitors? </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Wed, 07/29/2020 - 12:51</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/nyc%20outdoor%20dining%20header.jpg?itok=6gVy8qLu Former restauranteur and Dean of Restaurant &amp; Hospitality Management Rick Camac reflects on the shifts in New York City dining since the pandemic shutdown. <time datetime="2020-07-31T12:00:00Z">July 31, 2020</time> Rick Camac — Dean, Restaurant &amp; Hospitality Management <p>Clearly, the restaurant world has dramatically changed over a few short months and will continue to do so. COVID-19 changed the way restaurants operate, and some of these changes will continue on forever: better sanitizing, contactless menus, and definitively, better delivery.</p> <p>Restaurant strategies that were on the downslope when COVID-19 hit, such as fine dining, got hit much harder, and those on the upslope, such as ghost kitchens, QSRs, and yes, some fast food, are going to grow exponentially quicker.</p> <p>Independent restaurants and restaurant groups that never, in a million years, would have thought they’d be doing delivery and takeaway (or, at least, not a significant amount of it) are now, in fact, doing so. Reasons for not offering delivery previously included fine dining food not traveling well, the function only accounting for a small fraction of business, third-party delivery costing too much or an operator’s inability to control what happens once food leaves an establishment.</p> <p>At the same time, diners have changed how they eat and their preferences. Since the pandemic impacted the industry, the following things have changed dramatically:</p> <ul><li>They’ve become better cooks — many of us, much better.</li> <li>They’ve become accustomed to dining at home (whether cooking, picking up or getting delivery).</li> <li>Delivery service, quality and options have improved.</li> <li>Delivery and takeout packaging has improved, providing meals closer in quality and presentation to the dining-in experience.</li> <li>Even more meal kits with quality ingredients and easy instructions are available.</li> </ul><p>No longer are diners relegated to soggy pizza and poor quality, overcooked burgers with delivery. The best restaurants in town are delivering or offering window or curbside pick up. Will that end once COVID-19 has passed? For some entities, yes, but for many more, I think not. Most establishments cannot afford to turn away incremental revenue, and the cost of that business has come down dramatically since third parties’ egregious practices have been regulated.</p> <p>Just three months ago, would I have thought about paying $100 for delivery? Absolutely not! Now, when I can order from Rezdora, Wayla, Daniel (I’ll get back to this one shortly), Crown Shy (takeaway), Osteria Morini, Eataly, etc. and get a really quality meal, I will and have. In the past, once delivery went north of $60 or so, I would usually opt to go out (at which time I would likely spend a good bit more). Since COVID-19, I have ordered from some of the best places in the city. What I’ve learned is that having a really nice meal (that I don’t need to shop, prep, cook or clean up for) while watching another episode of my favorite Netflix show, is a pretty good experience. And mixing my own Negronis with ingredients (via Drizly delivery) that cost me about $100 all in but will make me more than 20 drinks, isn’t so bad either.</p> <p>A few weeks ago, my wife and I celebrated our 20th wedding anniversary. With basically nowhere to go dine in, we opted to get a weekend package from Restaurant Daniel. It included dinners for Friday and Saturday and brunch for Sunday. Yes, the charge was fairly significant, but for the cost of a dinner there (maybe less than the cost of one dinner), we had a weekend of incredible meals (and leftovers that lasted into the next week). It was a truly memorable experience at home.</p> <p>Now, once things open back up, and the “new normal” sets in, will we go back to dining out? For the most part, yes! We are social beings. We don’t live in NYC to stay home and get delivery. However, has the way New Yorkers dine changed? I believe so. I predict the following:</p> <ul><li>Initially, there will be a rush to get back to restaurants. Once it becomes clear that the experience will not be (for a while) what it once was, we will dine out less. Maybe four to five times per week becomes one to three.</li> <li>Takeout will continue to be prevalent.</li> <li>They will order delivery more frequently. Restaurants that got into the game will not easily leave it as that would render them less relevant in this “new normal” world.</li> <li>They will cook more.</li> <li>Restaurants will be more expensive.</li> </ul><p>The news is not all bad:</p> <ul><li>New players will enter the industry with better models and do well.</li> <li>Most restaurants that exist today (and make it through) will pivot to better business models as well.</li> <li>Better takeout and delivery is here to stay.</li> <li>Ghost kitchens and ghost food halls will flourish (if they have strong business plans, strong capitalization and stronger management).</li> </ul><p>Many restaurateurs will want to go back to the way things were. They will want to pull back from delivery and takeaway. Many will not. We’ve created our own monster. It’s not such a bad thing. It could just be part of a better way to do things.</p> <p><em>Read more about restaurants amid COVID-19, and navigate the industry with a diploma in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/restaurant-culinary-management-info" target="_blank">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management.</a></em></p> Restaurant Management Delivery COVID-19 <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=17431&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="6pOe5gNz_mk1YMPJWq3hT5Ax3WdnjIQNgJSogO0sMdM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Wed, 29 Jul 2020 16:51:53 +0000 aday 17431 at https://www.ice.edu https://www.ice.edu/blog/new-york-restaurant-post-pandemic-predictions#comments How to Start a Home Bakery https://www.ice.edu/blog/home-baking-business <span>How to Start a Home Bakery</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Fri, 06/19/2020 - 14:27</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/home%20bakery%20header.jpg?itok=nz__uiDX ICE alum Joy Cho (Pastry, &#039;19) shares her quarantine baking adventure, from restaurant job to home business. <time datetime="2020-06-19T12:00:00Z">June 19, 2020</time> Joy Cho — Pastry Writer <p>You know what they say: When life gives you lemons, make lemonade … or lemon curd for strawberry cake, lemon-ricotta cake with mint, or ditch the lemons altogether and roll with oranges instead.</p> <p>Up until three months ago, I was working the evening pastry service at my dream restaurant, <a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/work-at-michelin-starred-restaurant" target="_blank">Gramercy Tavern</a>. The schedule and nature of the work were grueling at times (especially transitioning from an office job), but I couldn’t imagine doing anything else. I also had a café pop-up planned that I was excited about and was starting to explore other opportunities on the side.</p> <p>I never could have anticipated that in mid-March, I would lose my job due to COVID-19, return to my hometown of Columbus, Ohio, and launch a weekly baked goods delivery service from my parents’ kitchen. The last few months have been a wild ride, but I’ve never been closer to pursuing my dreams of running my own small business. I’ve learned to make the most of the circumstances — unexpectedly, creatively and dynamically.</p> <p>Like so many hospitality professionals impacted by the pandemic, I felt lost and overwhelmed when I found out that I had been let go. What was I supposed to do with all this time? When would I be able to return to work? How do I even apply for unemployment benefits, and why was the system so difficult to navigate?</p> <p>Also like many hospitality professionals, I turned to what I knew how to do even in the midst of uncertainty and anxiety: making food and sharing it with others. It provided a unique comfort and structure to the sudden onslaught of free time I had never asked for but perhaps needed. It was one of the only ways to preserve some semblance of normalcy.</p> <p><img alt="Joy Cho's pastries" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Joy%20Cho%20Pastry.jpg" class="align-right" />At first, I baked with no real aim – I just wanted to be in the kitchen, baking up a storm and delivered the extras free of charge to anyone who responded to my Instagram stories. As I continued to share treats across central Ohio, I wondered if people would be willing to pay for my baked goods. Would anyone be interested? Was I qualified enough? There was no way to know though except to try, right? Thus the <a href="https://www.joychopastry.com/bakers-boxes" target="_blank">Baker’s Box</a> project was born. I would release a new curated box of three to four items for preorder each week through my website and Instagram and bake and deliver them to customers’ doorsteps the following week. Boxes were themed, whether a cupcake omakase box, a breakfast-inspired box or treats dedicated to cities I’ve lived in.</p> <p>Over the past two and a half months of launching this project, I’ve learned so much – talk about literal on-the-job, hands-on training. In a matter of weeks, I went from a pastry cook in NYC to head baker, small business owner, pseudo-graphic designer, cake decorator and marketer all in one. Baker’s Boxes, and the process of creation, execution and delivery, have optimized and evolved. Though there are more lessons I’ve gleaned than I have space to write about, I’ve outlined some of the biggest takeaways below:</p> <p><strong>Transitioning from a restaurant kitchen to a home bakery:</strong></p> <p>At Gramercy Tavern, I walked in every day to a list (and any additional notes from the chefs) that structured my shift. My job was to prep and execute my tasks accordingly. Transitioning to being the sole baker in the kitchen was quite the adjustment. Not only do I prep and bake my items each week, but I also have to take inventory, shop for ingredients, test menu items for the following week, respond to email inquiries, and keep up with social media and marketing. I’ve never been in a more dynamic role where I have to manage myself and structure my own days and weeks. I do miss the camaraderie of being part of a restaurant team, but it’s been exciting to explore the freedom of running my own concept.</p> <p><strong>Stepping out of my comfort zone:</strong></p> <p>I realized firsthand the value of “going for it” despite uncertainty and doubt. Spurred on by exploration rather than perfection, I pursued a series of collaborations with local breweries, using their beer in my box items; partnered with a national nonprofit one week to donate tips from sales to the organization; started a weekly email newsletter; ran a few Instagram giveaways; and streamlined the cake order process on my website. I’m still learning to put myself out there; it’s the best way to grow.</p> <p><strong>Working smarter, not harder:</strong></p> <p>Initially, this was a one-woman show: I was baking the Baker’s Box items, packaging them, turning around, making deliveries – and quickly burning out. I ended up hiring my first employee (my brother) to make deliveries. Though seemingly a small decision, handing off deliveries to someone else freed up a lot of time for me to work on more orders, cakes or other projects. With box items, too, I’ve increased efficiency by choosing one to two baked goods that can be prepped ahead of time (such as freezing unbaked cookie dough) so I’m not scrambling on delivery day. Adequate planning and strategizing have worked wonders, both in saving time and effort and also in preserving my own sanity.</p> <img alt="Joy Cho Pastry deliveries" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Joy%20Cho%20Pastry%20deliveries.jpg" class="align-center" /><p><strong>Enjoying the journey – in and out of the kitchen:</strong></p> <p>Coaching myself to slow down, celebrate my wins and take time to do non-baking things has been challenging and incredibly beneficial. Overworking is easy to do when you build your own schedule and can quickly lead to exhaustion and burnout (I learned that the hard way). Biking in nature, hanging with friends and setting aside time to work on personal projects are some ways I’ve found to ground myself.</p> <p>Baker’s Boxes started out as a way to keep myself occupied in this quarantine period and earn a bit of extra income, but they’ve become so much more in the process. I’ve been blown away by the support of central Ohioans, many of whom I’ve never met – the power of word-of-mouth or grassroots marketing cannot be underestimated. Posting a new menu every Thursday and sharing the treats with my customers has been a unique way to foster connection and hospitality even while socially distancing. This is my line of work, and it’s a huge privilege to share my passion with the community wherever I am.</p> <p>Though I’m not sure what the future will hold in terms of my career trajectory, I will always remember the past few months as a meaningful time when I took a chance, grew in unexpected ways as a pastry professional, and realized once again the power of homemade treats to brighten people’s lives. I’ve never felt more challenged, excited and overwhelmed (in a good way) by the possibilities that lie ahead. Stay tuned on my <a href="https://www.joychopastry.com/" target="_blank">website</a> and <a href="https://www.instagram.com/joycho_pastry/" target="_blank">Instagram</a> as I explore shipping options and potentially migrate Baker’s Boxes to the NYC area!</p> <p><em>Bake pro treats like Joy's with ICE's <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/career-programs/school-pastry-baking-arts">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts</a> program, and prepare for your food business launch with a dual diploma in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/restaurant-culinary-management-info" target="_blank">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Arts.</a></em></p> Pastry Arts Baking Arts Entrepreneurship Business of Food COVID-19 Midwest <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=17231&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="2R0HJaGBTYiUnKdKiRSi8EyW1gW7L3GUL80Do0gKx24"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Fri, 19 Jun 2020 18:27:32 +0000 aday 17231 at https://www.ice.edu Restaurants Get Savvy for Safe Reopenings https://www.ice.edu/blog/restaurants-reopening-strategies-contactless-technology <span>Restaurants Get Savvy for Safe Reopenings</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/08/2020 - 14:46</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Picos%20bar%20dividers%20header.jpg?itok=Sv0gFDh1 As restaurants around the world begin reopening with COVID-19-related restrictions, safety is the top priority. <time datetime="2020-07-08T12:00:00Z">July 8, 2020</time> Ashley Ross — Writer and Editor <p>While accommodating a fraction of capacity and adhering to CDC, state and restaurant association guidelines, restaurant owners and operators are ensuring that diners and staff feel safe with strategic creativity and touch-free technology.</p> <p>People are leaning toward whatever they possibly can to generate new business and make people feel as safe as possible. Some restaurants are using shower curtains between tables for separation, some are simply separating tables by six feet, and others are using mannequins or blow up toys to make a dining room feel full despite empty tables.</p> <p>Clear, plastic protective covers called Plex’eat, designed by Christophe Gernigon, went viral at the end of May after being showcased at a restaurant called H.A.N.D in Paris. Preorders for Plex’eat are apparently rolling in.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3OEF3Dtls/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:540px; min-width:326px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:16px;"> <div style=" display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display:block; height:50px; margin:0 auto 12px; width:50px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3OEF3Dtls/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank"><svg height="50px" version="1.1" viewbox="0 0 60 60" width="50px" xmlns="https://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="https://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"><g fill="none" fill-rule="evenodd" stroke="none" stroke-width="1"><g fill="#000000" transform="translate(-511.000000, -20.000000)"><g><path d="M556.869,30.41 C554.814,30.41 553.148,32.076 553.148,34.131 C553.148,36.186 554.814,37.852 556.869,37.852 C558.924,37.852 560.59,36.186 560.59,34.131 C560.59,32.076 558.924,30.41 556.869,30.41 M541,60.657 C535.114,60.657 530.342,55.887 530.342,50 C530.342,44.114 535.114,39.342 541,39.342 C546.887,39.342 551.658,44.114 551.658,50 C551.658,55.887 546.887,60.657 541,60.657 M541,33.886 C532.1,33.886 524.886,41.1 524.886,50 C524.886,58.899 532.1,66.113 541,66.113 C549.9,66.113 557.115,58.899 557.115,50 C557.115,41.1 549.9,33.886 541,33.886 M565.378,62.101 C565.244,65.022 564.756,66.606 564.346,67.663 C563.803,69.06 563.154,70.057 562.106,71.106 C561.058,72.155 560.06,72.803 558.662,73.347 C557.607,73.757 556.021,74.244 553.102,74.378 C549.944,74.521 548.997,74.552 541,74.552 C533.003,74.552 532.056,74.521 528.898,74.378 C525.979,74.244 524.393,73.757 523.338,73.347 C521.94,72.803 520.942,72.155 519.894,71.106 C518.846,70.057 518.197,69.06 517.654,67.663 C517.244,66.606 516.755,65.022 516.623,62.101 C516.479,58.943 516.448,57.996 516.448,50 C516.448,42.003 516.479,41.056 516.623,37.899 C516.755,34.978 517.244,33.391 517.654,32.338 C518.197,30.938 518.846,29.942 519.894,28.894 C520.942,27.846 521.94,27.196 523.338,26.654 C524.393,26.244 525.979,25.756 528.898,25.623 C532.057,25.479 533.004,25.448 541,25.448 C548.997,25.448 549.943,25.479 553.102,25.623 C556.021,25.756 557.607,26.244 558.662,26.654 C560.06,27.196 561.058,27.846 562.106,28.894 C563.154,29.942 563.803,30.938 564.346,32.338 C564.756,33.391 565.244,34.978 565.378,37.899 C565.522,41.056 565.552,42.003 565.552,50 C565.552,57.996 565.522,58.943 565.378,62.101 M570.82,37.631 C570.674,34.438 570.167,32.258 569.425,30.349 C568.659,28.377 567.633,26.702 565.965,25.035 C564.297,23.368 562.623,22.342 560.652,21.575 C558.743,20.834 556.562,20.326 553.369,20.18 C550.169,20.033 549.148,20 541,20 C532.853,20 531.831,20.033 528.631,20.18 C525.438,20.326 523.257,20.834 521.349,21.575 C519.376,22.342 517.703,23.368 516.035,25.035 C514.368,26.702 513.342,28.377 512.574,30.349 C511.834,32.258 511.326,34.438 511.181,37.631 C511.035,40.831 511,41.851 511,50 C511,58.147 511.035,59.17 511.181,62.369 C511.326,65.562 511.834,67.743 512.574,69.651 C513.342,71.625 514.368,73.296 516.035,74.965 C517.703,76.634 519.376,77.658 521.349,78.425 C523.257,79.167 525.438,79.673 528.631,79.82 C531.831,79.965 532.853,80.001 541,80.001 C549.148,80.001 550.169,79.965 553.369,79.82 C556.562,79.673 558.743,79.167 560.652,78.425 C562.623,77.658 564.297,76.634 565.965,74.965 C567.633,73.296 568.659,71.625 569.425,69.651 C570.167,67.743 570.674,65.562 570.82,62.369 C570.966,59.17 571,58.147 571,50 C571,41.851 570.966,40.831 570.82,37.631"></path></g></g></g></svg></a></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style=" color:#3897f0; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:550; line-height:18px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3OEF3Dtls/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank">View this post on Instagram</a></div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg)"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style=" width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3OEF3Dtls/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Christophe Gernigon Studio (@christophegernigonstudio)</a> on <time datetime="2020-05-31T18:46:35+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">May 31, 2020 at 11:46am PDT</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async="" src="//www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script><p>In Houston, Texas, Arnaldo Richards' Picos Restaurant installed plexiglass barriers along the bar. “We’ve been open for 36 years and have a very popular bar, we are known for our margaritas, so we wanted to put the plexiglass in,” Executive Chef and Owner Arnaldo Richards said. “So far, people love it.”</p> <p>"Restaurants are definitely using this time to think creatively about their operations," says ICE alum Jessica Abell (Culinary/Management, '14), head of projects and client experience at Oyster Sunday, a corporate office for independent restaurants. "One of the most creative uses of space I’ve seen is Mediamatic ETEN in Amsterdam, where they’ve built individual glass rooms for each table."</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA52UmMF_UY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:540px; min-width:326px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:16px;"> <div style=" display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display:block; height:50px; margin:0 auto 12px; width:50px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA52UmMF_UY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank"><svg height="50px" version="1.1" viewbox="0 0 60 60" width="50px" xmlns="https://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="https://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"><g fill="none" fill-rule="evenodd" stroke="none" stroke-width="1"><g fill="#000000" transform="translate(-511.000000, -20.000000)"><g><path d="M556.869,30.41 C554.814,30.41 553.148,32.076 553.148,34.131 C553.148,36.186 554.814,37.852 556.869,37.852 C558.924,37.852 560.59,36.186 560.59,34.131 C560.59,32.076 558.924,30.41 556.869,30.41 M541,60.657 C535.114,60.657 530.342,55.887 530.342,50 C530.342,44.114 535.114,39.342 541,39.342 C546.887,39.342 551.658,44.114 551.658,50 C551.658,55.887 546.887,60.657 541,60.657 M541,33.886 C532.1,33.886 524.886,41.1 524.886,50 C524.886,58.899 532.1,66.113 541,66.113 C549.9,66.113 557.115,58.899 557.115,50 C557.115,41.1 549.9,33.886 541,33.886 M565.378,62.101 C565.244,65.022 564.756,66.606 564.346,67.663 C563.803,69.06 563.154,70.057 562.106,71.106 C561.058,72.155 560.06,72.803 558.662,73.347 C557.607,73.757 556.021,74.244 553.102,74.378 C549.944,74.521 548.997,74.552 541,74.552 C533.003,74.552 532.056,74.521 528.898,74.378 C525.979,74.244 524.393,73.757 523.338,73.347 C521.94,72.803 520.942,72.155 519.894,71.106 C518.846,70.057 518.197,69.06 517.654,67.663 C517.244,66.606 516.755,65.022 516.623,62.101 C516.479,58.943 516.448,57.996 516.448,50 C516.448,42.003 516.479,41.056 516.623,37.899 C516.755,34.978 517.244,33.391 517.654,32.338 C518.197,30.938 518.846,29.942 519.894,28.894 C520.942,27.846 521.94,27.196 523.338,26.654 C524.393,26.244 525.979,25.756 528.898,25.623 C532.057,25.479 533.004,25.448 541,25.448 C548.997,25.448 549.943,25.479 553.102,25.623 C556.021,25.756 557.607,26.244 558.662,26.654 C560.06,27.196 561.058,27.846 562.106,28.894 C563.154,29.942 563.803,30.938 564.346,32.338 C564.756,33.391 565.244,34.978 565.378,37.899 C565.522,41.056 565.552,42.003 565.552,50 C565.552,57.996 565.522,58.943 565.378,62.101 M570.82,37.631 C570.674,34.438 570.167,32.258 569.425,30.349 C568.659,28.377 567.633,26.702 565.965,25.035 C564.297,23.368 562.623,22.342 560.652,21.575 C558.743,20.834 556.562,20.326 553.369,20.18 C550.169,20.033 549.148,20 541,20 C532.853,20 531.831,20.033 528.631,20.18 C525.438,20.326 523.257,20.834 521.349,21.575 C519.376,22.342 517.703,23.368 516.035,25.035 C514.368,26.702 513.342,28.377 512.574,30.349 C511.834,32.258 511.326,34.438 511.181,37.631 C511.035,40.831 511,41.851 511,50 C511,58.147 511.035,59.17 511.181,62.369 C511.326,65.562 511.834,67.743 512.574,69.651 C513.342,71.625 514.368,73.296 516.035,74.965 C517.703,76.634 519.376,77.658 521.349,78.425 C523.257,79.167 525.438,79.673 528.631,79.82 C531.831,79.965 532.853,80.001 541,80.001 C549.148,80.001 550.169,79.965 553.369,79.82 C556.562,79.673 558.743,79.167 560.652,78.425 C562.623,77.658 564.297,76.634 565.965,74.965 C567.633,73.296 568.659,71.625 569.425,69.651 C570.167,67.743 570.674,65.562 570.82,62.369 C570.966,59.17 571,58.147 571,50 C571,41.851 570.966,40.831 570.82,37.631"></path></g></g></g></svg></a></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style=" color:#3897f0; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:550; line-height:18px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA52UmMF_UY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank">View this post on Instagram</a></div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg)"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style=" width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA52UmMF_UY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Mediamatic ETEN (@mediamatic_eten)</a> on <time datetime="2020-06-01T19:16:51+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Jun 1, 2020 at 12:16pm PDT</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async="" src="//www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script><p>Chef Eric Ripert of three-Michelin-starred Le Bernardin in New York told the Wall Street Journal he’s planning to use open space to cook in front of guests. And Quality Branded restaurants, like Quality Eats and Quality Italian, are planning to pump out a recording of what a restaurant sounds like through speakers.</p> <p>Stratis Morfogen, owner of Brooklyn Chop House, planned to open Brooklyn Dumpling Shop in late summer and has had to adjust accordingly.</p> <p>“I wanted to do a 24-hour bakery for dumplings, taking traditional sandwiches we had at Chop House and turning them into dumplings,” he says. “When COVID-19 hit, some friends mentioned automats, so I started reading about the creators of the automat.”</p> <p>Automats are fast-food restaurants run kind of like a vending machine, where diners don’t see or interact with staff. They first started in 1895, and what got Stratis' attention was that after the Spanish flu, automats grew from two stores to 36 stores. Then he wondered why they went out of style.</p> <p>“Technology failed the automat because when meals started to be two or three dollars, people didn’t have that much money in their pocket,” he says. “Now technology isn’t just here, technology can make it into an even better model.”</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Brooklyn Dumpling Shop's contactless cubbies" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Brooklyn%20Dumpling%20Shop%20Rapid%20Pickup%20rendering%20web%20courtesy%20of%20Eye%20Catch_0.jpg" /><figcaption>Rendering courtesy of Eye Catch</figcaption></figure><p>The plan for Brooklyn Dumpling Shop is to have a touchless self-ordering kiosk, from the company Tray, where guests can hover their fingers over what they want to select and the screen detects the heat. Payment can be made by credit card or Apple Pay. A mobile barcode will open two separate lockers, one with food and one with drinks, neither of which require touch.</p> <p>The touchless factor is something other restaurants are trying to implement. The company Presto, which provides technology at chains like Applebee’s, Chili’s Grill &amp; Bar, Denny’s, and Outback Steakhouse, has garnered interest in its QR codes for tables to replace menus that customers need to touch. Non-chain restaurants from fast food to fine dining are drawn to Presto’s tech, perhaps for some of the company’s more advanced offerings like Computer Vision Technology. This AI-powered tech was initially meant to help restaurants measure wait times, guest bounces and guest experience scores in real-time. Now the functionality can help with measuring social distancing and restaurant capacity and communicating those findings with partners and stakeholders.</p> <p>To get started, Presto has put together a Contactless Dining Kit, which allows guests to use their personal mobile devices to scan NFC tags and QR codes at restaurants to view the complete menu, place orders, and pay with their phone at the table — without the need to touch any foreign surface or come into contact with people outside of their dining party.</p> <p>“It has been about a month since we launched the Presto Contactless Dining Kit,” says Founder and CEO Rajat Suri. “We were thinking hard about how to best help the restaurant industry get back on its feet again during the pandemic. We took learnings from research of other countries that were ahead of the curve in COVID-19 recovery to determine what new consumer demands and state restrictions might look like and combined those with our already existing order-and-pay technologies to create the kit.”</p> <p>QR codes are working well for many restaurants so far. Chris Shepherd, chef and owner with Underbelly Hospitality, says that two of Underbelly’s restaurants, Georgia James and One Fifth Mediterranean, are open at 50% capacity and have QR codes that lead to a food, cocktail and wine menu.</p> <p>“Some guests think it’s awesome but some want a regular menu so we give them a paper one we don’t reuse,” Chris says.</p> <p>Otherwise, he is trying to get creative with social distancing since for now, the dining room feels empty. He ordered 4x4-foot tempered glass dividers manufactured by Fullbrightco from a Houston dealer named Letourneau Keller.</p> <p>“They break up airflow, and you can’t see them unless you look down. They’re mobile so we can move them around and they don’t break,” Chris says. “It’s basically like a clear fence but it doesn’t hide you from anything and it adds comfort.”</p> <p>Chris admits some of his staff thinks he’s going over the top, but he wants to do whatever he can to make employees and guests feel safe and comfortable. He has heat sealers for silverware for every guest and small mist spray bottles branded with Underbelly Hospitality stickers and filled with hand sanitizer for every guest to take home.</p> <p>"If you’re reopening your doors and taking all of the necessary steps to ensure a safe environment, you should be communicating that to your guests at every touchpoint — your website, social media, email newsletter and reservations platform," Jessica advises.</p> <p><em>Learn more about food business strategies and develop your own business plan in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/restaurant-culinary-management-info" target="_blank">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management.</a></em></p> COVID-19 Business of Food Food Trends Technology Restaurant Management <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=17161&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="C6nh_-5KBhv5-6krs_6qbJKizYa9DMgPUrYQc_Eel78"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Jun 2020 18:46:34 +0000 aday 17161 at https://www.ice.edu https://www.ice.edu/blog/restaurants-reopening-strategies-contactless-technology#comments Restaurants Push through Pandemic Restraints with Retail Products https://www.ice.edu/blog/restaurant-retail-revenue-streams <span>Restaurants Push through Pandemic Restraints with Retail Products</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/21/2020 - 18:04</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/signmunds%20pretzels%20header.jpg?itok=V3-fCdCQ Sigmund&#039;s Pretzels ICE alumni Lina Kulchinsky and Tony Scotto share their pretzel and pasta successes despite the circumstances. <time datetime="2020-05-27T12:00:00Z">May 27, 2020</time> Ashley Ross — Writer and Editor <p>Three entrepreneurs share how their food businesses have proven sustainable due to diversified revenue streams from online and in-store retail.</p> <p>Before the coronavirus pandemic prevented restaurants and food brands from moving forward with any sense of normalcy, some chefs and restaurants were already set up for some form of success. Or at least some form of staying afloat.</p> <p>While many restaurants have had to pivot from initial ideas and visions to evolved actualities, sometimes the alternative product or business model is an eventual asset. This holds true for Tony Scotto (Culinary, ‘03), who runs DPNB Pasta Shop with his wife Louidell Scotto in Nyack, New York.</p> <p>“The original idea was to be a pasta-ramen bar, but the space we ended up finding in Nyack didn’t suit that so we pivoted to being a pasta shop with an extremely limited menu,” Tony says. “But then we expanded to this hybrid area, where the space was only 1,100-square-feet, most of which was not seating so we decided to maximize the revenue centers by retailing good beer and wine, fresh pasta, prosciutto, hot sauces and good coffee.”</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Tony Scotto (Culinary, ‘03) runs DPNB Pasta Shop with his wife Louidell Scotto" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="400" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DPNB%20promo.jpg" width="400" /><figcaption>Tony Scotto (Culinary, ‘03) runs DPNB Pasta Shop with his wife Louidell Scotto.</figcaption></figure><p>He and his wife’s goal was to have a small grocery store, small restaurant and small retail space — as diverse and as profitable as possible. Everything that was on the shelves would make it into the dishes on the limited menu so DPNB would put its dry storage up for sale, something that many restaurants are trying to do now as a way to make money off what’s already purchased and in-house. For Tony, it was always a way to make more revenue, inspired by places like Court Street Grocers and Salumeria Rossi in New York.</p> <p>As these revenue streams were set up at the inception of DPNB, it’s been a natural continuum during the pandemic. One big change he made at the outset of the crisis was discontinuing beer and alcohol service, or at least depleting the existing product and not ordering more. This has helped them stock only the product they know they’re going to sell. Items have been less financially lucrative since early March because of the alcohol exclusion, but adding things like pre-made meatballs, lasagna and roasted chicken to the menu to comfort people has paid off.</p> <p>“We’ve had two rather prominent businesses close in town, and I think they are places that didn’t have the infrastructure we had or other revenue streams,” Tony says. “My wife and business partner did an exceptionally good job of setting up our site for online ordering and things that eliminate the phone conversation.”</p> <p>Not that eliminating the phone conversation takes the personal connection out of the picture. For example, Mother’s Day was huge for DPNB with notes from customers at the bottom of orders thanking the team and saying how they couldn’t wait to order from DPNB again, something special that Tony says you don’t always get to see in the kitchen.</p> <p>“We were lucky or fortunate or smart enough to have the infrastructure in place before this happened, and it’s about trust. People are going to come back to the places they trust and think are clean and providing good value,” he says.</p> <p>Ben Conniff, co-founder and chief marketing officer at Luke’s Lobster, says his brand is in a similar position. In theory, Luke’s Lobster has 26 restaurants around the country but currently, 25 of them are closed. Founded in 2009, Luke’s restaurant business grew from the outset. As such, the company opened lobster production facilities in Maine and buys directly from lobstermen, distributing to itself. Over time, that led to a relationship with Whole Foods to sell lobster tails and eventually frozen lobster tails and frozen lobster meat.</p> <p>“Before coronavirus, we were looking to continue growing our business with Whole Foods but then [with coronavirus] we were thrown into a state of thinking differently and doing things differently,” Ben says. “Whole Foods has stepped up and taken more of our existing products and other products from us that they wouldn’t have normally. We are in the process of getting a few more dishes added and going out to new grocery accounts.”</p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Luke's Lobster products" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Lukes%20web.jpg" /><figcaption>Luke's Lobster products</figcaption></figure><p>Luke’s rapidly launched a direct-to-consumer website, which has helped the team send lobster and fish to regular customers and find untapped demand among other audiences in all 48 continental states, as opposed to just metro areas around restaurant locations.</p> <p>“It hasn’t replaced the lost revenue and profit from 25 restaurants but it has helped keep the team going and it’s helped us continue buying from the fishermen and get their products to a wider audience,” Ben says. “We can also diversify. The first example is dayboat scallops, which we don’t serve in our restaurants. But we could get them to people from our website at the beginning of the season and we plan to launch halibut in halibut season.”</p> <p>This isn’t just a way to help Luke’s Lobster survive right now; it’s a long-term addition to the company. Under the extreme circumstances, the team mobilized quickly and gets a little better every day.</p> <p>Similar to DPNB, Luke’s saw a huge lift around Mother’s Day, an exciting sign that maybe every week and every month the business could expand. For Memorial Day, Luke’s is offering a special pack with two lobster tails, lemon-garlic marinade and Maine chocolate-covered potato chips. The company also hopes to build out more with the site and experience by creating instructional videos with Maine chefs, including James Beard Award winners and nominees.</p> <p>“Cooking with our product is one thing people can do to enrich their existence right now,” Ben says. “We’re looking to be a resource for people to understand how simple it can be to use their time at home to learn a new craft, which is cooking sustainable seafood. Seventy percent of seafood in America is consumed in restaurants so we feel a great responsibility to get that seafood into people’s hands.”</p> <p>Lina Kulchinsky (Pastry, '07) is in a similar season of expansion. She founded Sigmund’s Pretzels in 2009 hoping to be an upscale version of Auntie Anne’s. A retail space for a bar and bakery worked for a while but then turned into an opportunity for business elsewhere: sharing pretzels with other bars and bakeries and then bigger companies like Madison Square Garden, airports, offices and even at events like weddings. In 2017 and 2018, Lina started to explore what e-commerce looked like for a perishable product like pretzels.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Sigmund's Pretzels are available on Goldbelly." data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/signmunds%20pretzels%20header.jpg" /><figcaption>Sigmund's Pretzels are available on Goldbelly.</figcaption></figure><p>“We did have a partner in Goldbelly, and it’s been pretty exciting since they’ve helped us during this time with about 400 to 500 orders in the past six weeks, which is even more than what we do in December, what’s usually our biggest month because of holidays,” she says.</p> <p>It’s pretty serendipitous considering Lina thought she’d have to postpone everything until she was able to rally workers who could drive to the bakery safely without needing to risk their health on public transportation.</p> <p>“I’m glad we didn’t stop because we had to completely rework how we do fulfillment, and it was pretty cool. We learned a lot and we all realized that having a direct-to-consumer channel outside of your local channel is something you have to have in the mix,” she says.</p> <p>Now she’s considering a line extension like mustards and a pretzel chip that’s shelf-stable and easier to ship.</p> <p>“Things are going to be slow for a while. It’s doable, but it’s definitely tricky and also an exciting development,” she says. “It’s not clear if we’re going to be able to pivot fast enough but I’m excited.”</p> <p><em>Develop your food business idea with strategies like diverse revenue streams in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/restaurant-culinary-management-info" target="_blank">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management.</a></em></p> Alumni Interview COVID-19 Business of Food <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=17066&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="lspWvY2cE2lFFSNEu7dErOOseHYZSU6cbo7PRqOjMmg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Thu, 21 May 2020 22:04:12 +0000 aday 17066 at https://www.ice.edu California Restaurants Get Guidelines for Reopening https://www.ice.edu/blog/california-restaurants-reopening-guidelines <span>California Restaurants Get Guidelines for Reopening</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Sun, 05/17/2020 - 12:32</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/reopening%20header.jpg?itok=sbUa4XX9 Our management director advises on modified service and rethinking hospitality. <time datetime="2020-05-17T12:00:00Z">May 17, 2020</time> Kiri Tannenbaum — Director of Culinary Relations <p>California Governor Gavin Newsom announced reopening guidelines for restaurants on May 12 — two months after he issued a stay-at-home order that put a halt to dine-in operations. Now, restaurant owners and operators are navigating how to safely reopen their doors to diners craving a sit-down meal amid new rules and regulations.</p> <p>The 12-page <a href="https://covid19.ca.gov/pdf/guidance-dine-in-restaurants.pdf" target="_blank">guidance document</a>, available on the state’s website, directs restaurants, brewpubs, craft distilleries, breweries, bars, pubs and wineries on mandates for providing clean and safe environments for diners and workers. Businesses are advised to screen for COVID-19 symptoms (like taking workers’ temperatures before their shifts), update cleaning and sanitizing protocols, adhere to physical distancing and train employees on proper hand-washing and use of face coverings.</p> <p>“Governor Newsom was a restaurateur prior to being in government,” says Mishel LeDoux, director of restaurant and hospitality management at our Los Angeles campus. “He’s not just listening to other experts, he gets it having been somebody who understands the financial implications and structural differences between fast-casual, bars and fine-dining establishments.”</p> <p>Many establishments have been dormant since March 19 or pivoted to delivery and pick-up only, and operators must educate staff and guests on the new world order if reopening dine-in operations.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAGm-47pFhU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:540px; min-width:326px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:16px;"> <div style=" display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display:block; height:50px; margin:0 auto 12px; width:50px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAGm-47pFhU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank"><svg height="50px" version="1.1" viewbox="0 0 60 60" width="50px" xmlns="https://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="https://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"><g fill="none" fill-rule="evenodd" stroke="none" stroke-width="1"><g fill="#000000" transform="translate(-511.000000, -20.000000)"><g><path d="M556.869,30.41 C554.814,30.41 553.148,32.076 553.148,34.131 C553.148,36.186 554.814,37.852 556.869,37.852 C558.924,37.852 560.59,36.186 560.59,34.131 C560.59,32.076 558.924,30.41 556.869,30.41 M541,60.657 C535.114,60.657 530.342,55.887 530.342,50 C530.342,44.114 535.114,39.342 541,39.342 C546.887,39.342 551.658,44.114 551.658,50 C551.658,55.887 546.887,60.657 541,60.657 M541,33.886 C532.1,33.886 524.886,41.1 524.886,50 C524.886,58.899 532.1,66.113 541,66.113 C549.9,66.113 557.115,58.899 557.115,50 C557.115,41.1 549.9,33.886 541,33.886 M565.378,62.101 C565.244,65.022 564.756,66.606 564.346,67.663 C563.803,69.06 563.154,70.057 562.106,71.106 C561.058,72.155 560.06,72.803 558.662,73.347 C557.607,73.757 556.021,74.244 553.102,74.378 C549.944,74.521 548.997,74.552 541,74.552 C533.003,74.552 532.056,74.521 528.898,74.378 C525.979,74.244 524.393,73.757 523.338,73.347 C521.94,72.803 520.942,72.155 519.894,71.106 C518.846,70.057 518.197,69.06 517.654,67.663 C517.244,66.606 516.755,65.022 516.623,62.101 C516.479,58.943 516.448,57.996 516.448,50 C516.448,42.003 516.479,41.056 516.623,37.899 C516.755,34.978 517.244,33.391 517.654,32.338 C518.197,30.938 518.846,29.942 519.894,28.894 C520.942,27.846 521.94,27.196 523.338,26.654 C524.393,26.244 525.979,25.756 528.898,25.623 C532.057,25.479 533.004,25.448 541,25.448 C548.997,25.448 549.943,25.479 553.102,25.623 C556.021,25.756 557.607,26.244 558.662,26.654 C560.06,27.196 561.058,27.846 562.106,28.894 C563.154,29.942 563.803,30.938 564.346,32.338 C564.756,33.391 565.244,34.978 565.378,37.899 C565.522,41.056 565.552,42.003 565.552,50 C565.552,57.996 565.522,58.943 565.378,62.101 M570.82,37.631 C570.674,34.438 570.167,32.258 569.425,30.349 C568.659,28.377 567.633,26.702 565.965,25.035 C564.297,23.368 562.623,22.342 560.652,21.575 C558.743,20.834 556.562,20.326 553.369,20.18 C550.169,20.033 549.148,20 541,20 C532.853,20 531.831,20.033 528.631,20.18 C525.438,20.326 523.257,20.834 521.349,21.575 C519.376,22.342 517.703,23.368 516.035,25.035 C514.368,26.702 513.342,28.377 512.574,30.349 C511.834,32.258 511.326,34.438 511.181,37.631 C511.035,40.831 511,41.851 511,50 C511,58.147 511.035,59.17 511.181,62.369 C511.326,65.562 511.834,67.743 512.574,69.651 C513.342,71.625 514.368,73.296 516.035,74.965 C517.703,76.634 519.376,77.658 521.349,78.425 C523.257,79.167 525.438,79.673 528.631,79.82 C531.831,79.965 532.853,80.001 541,80.001 C549.148,80.001 550.169,79.965 553.369,79.82 C556.562,79.673 558.743,79.167 560.652,78.425 C562.623,77.658 564.297,76.634 565.965,74.965 C567.633,73.296 568.659,71.625 569.425,69.651 C570.167,67.743 570.674,65.562 570.82,62.369 C570.966,59.17 571,58.147 571,50 C571,41.851 570.966,40.831 570.82,37.631"></path></g></g></g></svg></a></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style=" color:#3897f0; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:550; line-height:18px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAGm-47pFhU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank">View this post on Instagram</a></div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg)"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style=" width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <p style=" margin:8px 0 0 0; padding:0 4px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAGm-47pFhU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#000; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none; word-wrap:break-word;" target="_blank">Statement from CRA President and CEO, Jot Condie, regarding Gov. @gavinnewsom reopening guidelines for California restaurants: . . #CRA #CARestaurants #CaliforniaRestaurants #California #SupportLocalRestaurants #LocalRestaurants #FarmToFork #HereInSac</a></p> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;">A post shared by <a href="https://www.instagram.com/calrestaurants/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px;" target="_blank"> California Restaurant Assoc.</a> (@calrestaurants) on <time datetime="2020-05-12T21:41:33+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">May 12, 2020 at 2:41pm PDT</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async="" src="//www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script><p>“Before reopening, restaurants should update their websites, add signage and marker points as to where people should stand, and mark areas where customers cannot enter,” Mishel explains. “They are not only protecting their guests but the employees as well.”</p> <p>She recommends restaurants inform customers of the changes they will experience when dining in by setting up an automatic email reply for reservations and detail menu and operational changes on social media. “Make the messaging about being respectful to everyone,” she adds, advising disclaimers on disposable print menus to reiterate the new practices.</p> <p>For an industry predicated on “service with a smile,” a masked host or server limits traditional communication. How can restaurant staff convey warm hospitality?</p> <p>“I told my students, when I was a GM, I hugged and kissed hundreds of people a night,” Mishel says. “That is going to change.” She suggests front-of-house professionals evolve communication skills.</p> <p>“Employees have to make that connection with people verbally and with eye contact,” she says, advising that staff remember clients’ names and focus on their tastes. Restaurants can use platforms like OpenTable and other technology to track diners’ preferences. If you know a guest likes to drink albariño, you can recommend a glass when greeting them. While bar areas still have to remain closed, alcohol can be served to diners.</p> <p>Since diners won’t be cozying up to the bar for a pre-dinner beverage or racking up big bar tabs for group celebrations, Mishel suggests restaurants maximize the bar check with innovative strategies. “Maybe guests take a dessert home, that is prepped and ready to go, and the restaurant offers a tawny port for takeout,” she recommends.</p> <p>With the rise in takeout and delivery, Mishel emphasizes the importance of packaging. “We are visual creatures, the way you deliver products to people should draw them in.”</p> <p>Mishel also suggests restaurateurs collaborate with their teams for fresh perspectives and ideas, like branded spice rubs, sauces or jarred baking mixes. “Whether a partnership with another company or on your own, make it easy for the end user to understand,” she says. Ultimately, the goal is to maximize the diner’s check average. “Make that experience even more grand for guests with something they can bring home.”</p> <p>Mishel believes strategic management is crucial now more than ever. “Chefs have to be ahead of the game,” she says. “They can’t just bust out a dish and scribble a menu description the way they used to. They will have to type something up, have good standard operating procedure (SOP), and provide training materials and documents to staff.”</p> <p>The biggest question for industry operators is whether restaurants can turn a profit with these new dine-in restrictions.</p> <p>“I think they can, but it depends on how savvy they were at controlling their costs prior to the pandemic,” Mishel predicts. “Restaurant groups and restaurateurs have to commit to understanding the new nuances of the business and come up with creative ideas, whether technology or selling new products like market baskets, merchandise or cocktails-to-go. Restaurants will really need to figure out ways to drive top-line sales to make money for the bottom line.”</p> <p><em>Study food business strategies with Mishel in ICE's <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/restaurant-culinary-management-info" target="_blank">Restaurant &amp; Culinary Management program.</a></em></p> Los Angeles Restaurants COVID-19 Restaurant Management <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=17036&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="vM8Dc3mkfEWHekq7ouQQzIocMyvFx3Uo9nCeSVWw6mg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Sun, 17 May 2020 16:32:40 +0000 aday 17036 at https://www.ice.edu https://www.ice.edu/blog/california-restaurants-reopening-guidelines#comments Adrienne Cheatham's Path to Private Cheffing https://www.ice.edu/blog/private-chef-career <span>Adrienne Cheatham&#039;s Path to Private Cheffing</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/15/2020 - 15:55</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Adrienne%20private%20chef%20header.jpg?itok=MblwyXCb ICE alum and former Le Bernardin executive sous chef, Adrienne Cheatham (Culinary, &#039;07) shares her journey to accepting the private chef path, figuratively and physically. <time datetime="2020-05-18T12:00:00Z">May 18, 2020</time> Adrienne Cheatham — ICE Chef <p>In an industry where offensive jokes and cursing have historically been commonplace, there are very few things one can say that are considered “dirty words.” Conversation that would make even the “Mad Men” blush would hardly cause someone from the back of house at a restaurant to bat an eye. But there’s something about hearing the words “private chef,” that once put a look of disdain on the faces of a whole brigade.</p> <p>There was a certain stigma that came along with private chef work in the restaurant industry, it was passed on to newly minted line cooks as tribal knowledge along with mise-en-place lists and station recipes. Before knowing why they looked at it with contempt, I could feel the disdain in the way senior cooks and sous chefs spoke about private chefs when I was starting out.</p> <p>I had my own culturally inherited reasons to consider private work something I would never do. After slavery, there weren’t many jobs available to people of color, especially women. For several generations, gainful employment of African American women in the U.S. had largely been relegated to domestic work – housekeepers, nannies, cooks – in the homes of wealthier, predominantly white people.</p> <p>When I proudly announced to my parents in high school that I wanted to become a chef, my father (who is black and grew up in Mississippi), crossed his arms over his chest, hung his head and told me that he fought for civil rights and equality so that his children could become something more than a servant. I was shocked, a “servant?” I told him things had changed since his parents’ generation, and I wanted to cook professionally, meaning that I wanted to work in fine-dining, Michelin-starred restaurants and become the first black woman chef to hold a Michelin rating. He cocked his head to the side, and told me that after he worked to obtain two master’s degrees, me becoming a “glorified burger flipper” was taking our family a step back.</p> <p>Luckily, things started changing within a few years of my announcement: Food culture was starting to be highlighted on television beyond just a few shows on PBS, and chefs started to gain notoriety and respect for their work. This visibility helped my father understand the art and craft of cooking that I had chosen to dedicate myself to as a restaurant chef. But this visibility of restaurant chefs had not yet changed the perception of cooking food in someone else’s home as a private chef.</p> <p><img alt="Chef Adrienne Cheatham" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="600" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Adrienne%20Cheatham%20portrait%20(1).jpg" width="400" class="align-right" />Racial issues aside, there was another inherited barrier to considering private work as a respectable option. Traditionally, cooking has been considered a woman’s job in the home and received little respect, but when cooking became a serious profession, women were largely shut out. We could cook at home (or in someone else’s home) but not in the vaunted hotels and restaurants where it was considered a man’s job.</p> <p>These perspectives were part of me long before I worked in any restaurant. But it was in restaurants that I picked up another perspective on working as a private chef from my tribe of male counterparts who were mostly white: It was something you do if you couldn’t hack it in professional kitchens. It was like wearing a scarlet letter: You were looked at as someone who couldn’t handle the pressure, couldn’t meet the standards of professional kitchens or had burnt out. Any way you looked at it, this was not something I ever wanted to be associated with.</p> <p>But just as menus change, so does the world. Concepts like work-life balance and mental health were working their way into social consciousness. It has become less okay to expect cooks to work 16-hour days, seven days a week, at the expense of family and personal relationships, under tremendous physical and mental stress, without making a livable wage. Only with a promotion to a head chef position did things get better, but the number of executive chefs are a small percentage of the number of people in back-of-house careers. Within the industry, it was well-known for a long time that this wasn’t a sustainable lifestyle or work model, but most chefs seemed reluctant to make changes.</p> <p>A new generation of people who wanted to pursue their culinary passions wondered why they had to sacrifice their health and sanity for the art and craft of cooking. There had to be other paths that didn’t require you to give up your life to be able to cook good food. As this younger generation was beginning to question the status quo, some in the older generations were starting to admit that the old way wasn’t necessarily the right way, and wanting a life didn’t mean that you were selling your culinary soul.</p> <p>Other professions within the culinary industry were attracting people who would have otherwise seen kitchens as their only option for creative expression with food. People were going to culinary school with no intention or desire of ever working in a restaurant kitchen, the times had changed. I was younger than some of my peers but had been trained by old-school chefs and had heard their regrets about sacrificing so much for a job that they physically could no longer perform in the same way after it took its toll for years.</p> <p>In a rare moment of reflection, one of my chef mentors dropped some true gems of knowledge on me out of the blue. He told me that he had wanted to leave restaurant life earlier but had “Stockholm syndrome,” that there should be no shame in wanting to see your family, and that the act of cooking and making people happy is why we do this, so why do we have to be so miserable?</p> <p>I continued in restaurants for years after this conversation, and so did he. During those years I started hearing the conversation around private chef work change. Chefs, men and women, began to talk about it as something they would inevitably do when they were ready to leave restaurants. Not because they had to, but because they chose to. They spoke longingly about the prospect of having more time with their families, starting families, having weekends off and making a respectable living. But I still had my cultural hang ups and wasn’t so sure.</p> <p>After I left my last restaurant post as the head chef, I was exhausted, physically and mentally. I had always thought I was impervious to burn-out, but after almost two years of working for a chef that I had to travel with for demos and events, while also being the exec chef of his flagship restaurant, I had only been able to take 2.5 days off. I was burning out. Most work days began at 7:30 a.m. (stepping into the restaurant) and ended at 11:30 p.m.-12 a.m. (out the door). On days I could sneak away, I would take short naps between services in a certain banquette booth while my sous chefs were putting up family meal and doing the ordering. I realized I was probably shaving years off of my life, and my chef either didn’t notice or in an old-school way, expected it. I gave proper notice and left.</p> <p>I didn’t have a plan, but I let some of my former chefs know that I was taking time off and to please send me any referrals they thought I’d be a good fit for. I was contacted by head hunters from prestigious restaurant groups, and while deciding what restaurant I wanted to go out for, I got an email from one former three-Michelin-starred chef of mine about a long-time regular from the restaurant who was looking for a new private chef. We talked about it and I said, “Chef, thanks for thinking of me, but no way.” My chef told me I would be crazy not to consider it; I would have weekends off, holidays off, and I’d be home by 9 p.m. during the week and earn a good salary. I decided to interview and do a tasting for the client.</p> <p>I was contacted and told the client wanted to make an offer, and while my chef was right about the perks he mentioned, there were more: benefits, health coverage, paid vacation time, no travel requirement (which is uncommon), and because of my experience as an exec sous at a three-Michelin-starred restaurant, the starting salary was higher than I expected. Still, I wanted to go back to being a restaurant chef so I gave the client a one-year commitment. At the end of the year I was happy, loving my job, learning everyday, experimenting, and the client turned out to be one of the most genuinely good people I’ve ever had the pleasure of cooking for. I have now held the private chef position with my client for two and a half years.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Chef Adrienne's dishes for a private client" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Adrienne's%20dishes.JPG" /><figcaption>Chef Adrienne's dishes for a private client</figcaption></figure><p>One of the greatest benefits is the freedom. Since finishing as runner-up on my season of “<a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/ice-alum-adrienne-cheatham-competes-season-top-chef">Top Chef</a>,” I started a pop-up series, SundayBest, that I’ve been able to grow into a city-hopping series of sold-out dinners. I’m working on a cookbook based on the pop-up series, and I get to do brand-building and ambassador work with companies and causes that I truly believe in — all while having a steady job that allows me to pay my bills and invest in myself.</p> <p>I am constantly pushing myself, thinking on my feet and being far more creative in ways that I may not be able to in restaurants (French one night, Punjabi the next, followed by Italian…). I also get to flex muscles that not all chefs have an opportunity to regularly; imagine being the prep cook, line cook, pastry chef and exec chef of an operation, and the skills required to execute every course to the highest level. There are no James Beard Awards or Food &amp; Wine accolades for private work, but with social media, private chefs can still share our work with the food-loving world.</p> <p>When I’m out doing my daily shopping for work, I’ve run into several old friends and coworkers at fish markets, niche produce purveyors and high-end butcher shops, and all of them are doing private work. Some of these are the very restaurant chefs that once spoke so distastefully of private chefs. They’re still cooking and making people happy with amazing food, just in a more intimate setting. And all of them are happy.</p> <p><em>See <a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/gig-economy-apps-for-chefs">five apps for freelance chef work</a>, and pursue an array of entrepreneurial career paths with a <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" target="_blank">diploma from ICE.</a></em></p> Culinary Education Alumni Career Food Culture ICE Chef <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=17031&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="xP4ZX54TZelFAAGkTtVV9hew0PwSAShQye_WajFm1Dg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Fri, 15 May 2020 19:55:57 +0000 aday 17031 at https://www.ice.edu https://www.ice.edu/blog/private-chef-career#comments