Pastry &amp; Baking Arts https://www.ice.edu/ en Chef Jürgen’s Homemade Halloween Candy Bars https://www.ice.edu/blog/homemade-halloween-candy-bar <span>Chef Jürgen’s Homemade Halloween Candy Bars</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79501" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abaker</span></span> <span>Mon, 10/18/2021 - 11:50</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/chefjurgen_halloweencandy_october2021_HERO.jpg?itok=ynjBW9f_ Making your own sweet treats from the comfort of your home has never been easier. <time datetime="2021-10-18T12:00:00Z">October 18, 2021</time> Abbe Baker — Content Director <p>Have you ever wanted to make your own Halloween candy? ICE’s Director of Pastry Research and Development, Jürgen David, shares two candy bar recipes to spruce up your trick-or-treating.</p> <p>Full stop: candy is delicious, and whether it be bite- or king-sized, Halloween gives us an excuse to load up on all your favorite store-bought treats. But believe it or not, making a rendition of your own favorite candy bar can easily be done at home. <br /><br /> Chef Jürgen took some inspiration from some classic candy combinations, pairing up peanut butter and apple jelly, as well as dark chocolate and coconut. <br /><br /> “These candy bars are made with things you likely already have in your pantry,” he says. Indeed, the recipes below include both milk and dark chocolate, peanut butter, two basic types of cereal, marshmallow fluff, coconut and apple jelly. Don’t have apple jelly? Not to worry, Chef Jürgen encourages you to make a swap with whatever you have on hand. “Grape, raspberry and strawberry work just as well — think classic PB&amp;J.”</p> <p><em><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/pastry-chef-jurgen-david">Meet Chef Jürgen.</a></em><br /><br /> Both bars feature a base consisting of crunchy corn flakes or crispy rice puffs with chocolate, and are topped with substantial fillings before being covered with their chocolatey outer shell. Set it and forget it, and either serve as is or cut it into bite-size pieces — you can’t get simpler than that. <br /><br /> “I loved the Junior Schokolade candy bar growing up,” says Chef Jürgen, nostalgic for the white chocolate bar studded with crispy rice cereal featuring a cartoon Brontosaurus mascot that he could find during his youth in Vienna, Austria. “The dinosaur sold me.” </p> <p><img alt="jurgen_halloween_candy_bar_2021" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/jurgen_halloween_candy_2021_INLINE.jpg" class="align-center" /><br /> Whichever recipe you choose, the end result is worth the effort (and you can swap the double-boiler for the microwave should you have time constraints). Soon your pantry will be fully stocked with homemade candy bars to your liking.</p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info"><em>Learn more about earning a Pastry &amp; Baking diploma at ICE.</em></a><br />  </p> <h5>Peanut Butter-Milk Chocolate and Apple Bars</h5> <p><em>Makes 6 1”x6” bars</em></p> <ul><li>120 grams white chocolate</li> <li>¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon</li> <li>60 grams crispy rice cereal, crushed or blitzed in a food processor</li> <li>150 grams smooth peanut butter</li> <li>75 grams confectioners’ sugar</li> <li>Pinch of salt</li> <li>100 grams apple jelly</li> <li>300 grams milk chocolate, for glazing</li> <li>Halloween sprinkles</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Heat white chocolate in a medium mixing bowl over a double boiler until just melted. </li> <li>Using a rubber spatula, stir in ground cinnamon and crushed cereal.</li> <li>Pour mixture on parchment paper, cover with parchment paper and roll to a thickness of ¼-inch and about 5x6 inches in size. Transfer to a sheet pan and let it firm up for about 5–10 minutes.</li> <li>Using a serrated knife, carefully cut into six 1-inch strips. Set aside for later.</li> <li>In a medium mixing bowl, combine peanut butter, confectioners’ sugar and salt with a rubber spatula. Mixture will be firm.</li> <li>Place peanut butter mixture into piping bag fitted with a medium plain tip (about #4 or #5). Pipe two logs on each crispy chocolate strip, leaving some space in the middle.</li> <li>Using a second piping bag fitted with a small plain tip (#3), pipe apple jelly into the middle of the peanut mixture.</li> <li>Temper the milk chocolate and put into a piping bag, cut a small opening and pipe over one bar at a time.</li> <li>Top bars with Halloween sprinkles before milk chocolate hardens.</li> <li>If desired, cut bars into 3 or 4 pieces once set.</li> </ol><h5>Dark Chocolate, Coconut and Almond Bars</h5> <p><em>Makes 6 1”x6” bars</em></p> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>120 grams dark chocolate</li> <li>60 grams corn flakes cereal, crushed</li> <li>100 grams dark chocolate, melted</li> <li>Pinch of salt</li> <li>100 grams heavy cream  </li> <li>100 grams dark chocolate (bitter sweet, 74%)</li> <li>150 grams marshmallow fluff</li> <li>150 grams desiccated coconut</li> <li>75 grams Coco Lopez cream of coconut</li> <li> ½ cup whole almonds, lightly toasted (about 36 pieces)</li> <li>300 grams dark chocolate, for glazing</li> <li>Marzipan skeleton pieces</li> <li>Halloween sprinkles</li> </ul><ol></ol> <ol><li>Heat 120 grams of dark chocolate in a medium mixing bowl over a double boiler until just melted. </li> <li>Using a rubber spatula, stir in crushed corn flakes.</li> <li>Pour mixture on parchment paper, cover with parchment paper and roll to a thickness of ¼-inch and about 5x6 inches in size. Transfer to a sheet pan and let it firm up for about 5–10 minutes.</li> <li>Using a serrated knife, carefully cut into six 1-inch strips. Set aside for later.</li> <li>In a medium mixing bowl over a double boiler, melt 100 grams dark chocolate.</li> <li>Heat 100 grams heavy cream. Pour over 100 grams dark chocolate. Let rest for about 1 minute.</li> <li>With a small whisk, make small, concentric circles until emulsified, smooth and shiny. Let cool at room temperature until ready to pipe.</li> <li>In a medium bowl, mix marshmallow fluff, desiccated coconut and cream of coconut together until smooth. </li> <li>Place coconut mixture into piping bag fitted with a medium plain tip (about #4 or #5). Pipe two logs on each crispy chocolate strip, leaving some space in the middle.</li> <li>Using a second piping bag fitted with a small plain tip (#3), pipe chocolate ganache into the middle of the coconut mixture.</li> <li>Place and line the whole almonds in a line in the center of each bar.</li> <li>Temper the dark chocolate and put into a piping bag, cut a small opening and pipe over one bar at a time.</li> <li>Top bars with marzipan skeleton pieces and Halloween sprinkles before dark chocolate hardens.</li> <li>If desired, cut bars into 3 or 4 pieces once set.</li> </ol> Pastry Arts Candy <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23731&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="_B-Q7Bv9oJ4PMS9UT1u5R0rZJ8svA05afsn4alfSotU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Mon, 18 Oct 2021 15:50:51 +0000 abaker 23731 at https://www.ice.edu How to Make a Mold https://www.ice.edu/blog/custom-chocolate-mold <span>How to Make a Mold</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Sat, 09/25/2021 - 10:03</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/custom%20mold%20final%20header.jpg?itok=hHWouH_Y Pastry chef Penny Stankiewicz shares her custom sugar art tricks. <time datetime="2021-09-25T12:00:00Z">September 25, 2021</time> Penny Stankiewicz — Chef-Instructor, Pastry &amp; Baking Arts, The Art of Cake Decorating <p>In my cake decorating and sugar art business, Sugar Couture, one policy that has not changed since the beginning is a requirement that all my work is custom. That provides an exciting opportunity to find creative ways to make things happen for each client, like a custom chocolate mold.</p> <p>If a bride wants the lace from her veil to be replicated on her wedding cake, or I find a gorgeous trinket at an antique market that would be a perfect adornment for a cake, I have to find ways of bringing those details to life.</p> <p>Standing out in a crowded field means that I have to bring something to the table that other designers don’t. Making custom molds for uses in all formats are one of the ways I can make gorgeous and unique pieces that will only be found in my work. I was doing this long before there were so many commercially available molds.</p> <p>I love the challenge of figuring things out. What parts connect on a motorcycle’s engine? How is a dress constructed? The ability to break things down and replicate them is the true job of a sugar artist. A unique project I was tasked with recently: a chocolate bar created from a 3D-printed wavy art piece. The client had only one of these pieces.</p> <p>I have many tricks to make food-safe molds, and I make choices of which to use based on the needs of the piece. Is it large? Does it have a lot of detail? Lots of undercuts? Do I need one or many? Will this mold be used in high volume or just once? How much time do I have to create the piece?</p> <p>The original was very thin, undulating and rather large, about 4x7 inches. I needed only one chocolate piece for a specialty gift for a very discerning recipient. I chose to use a molding product for this that I could melt and pour over the prepared piece. It would set quickly, and since I only needed it once, I can remelt the material and make another mold.</p> <p>Prep was the most important step here. It's best if the materials I use to make a mold are not used for any other purpose. Here are the items I use:</p> <ul><li>Original piece to mold.</li> <li>Thin plastic cutting board or another non-silicone base that I won’t use for anything else.</li> <li>Depending on the size of the positive, a container that it fits in with only about a half-inch of space all around <strong>or</strong> L-brackets (metal or plastic) with binder clips or clamps.</li> <li>Petroleum jelly.</li> <li>Hairdryer or heat gun.</li> <li>Pot or microwave-safe bowl.</li> <li>Mixing spoon.</li> <li>Modeling clay.</li> <li>Mold-making material, in this case ComposiMold, which is reusable.</li> </ul><p>If the piece I want to make will fit in, say, a pint container with space all the way around it, I'll use something like that to make the mold. If you're making your own mold, look around and see what you have that you are ok parting with. If you plan on making many molds over time, investing in mold box L brackets is the way to go. This gives you the flexibility to make a mold any size you need.</p> <p>I prepare the base for the mold first. I've been using an inexpensive laminated shelf as the base, and a flexible cutting mat works great. Keep in mind some items may be damaged through this process. Many won’t, but if you’re planning on using something that is special or expensive to mold, you may want to consider that it can be damaged in the process.</p> <img alt="the custom mold making process" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/custom%20mold%20montage.jpg" class="align-center" /><p>I clean and dry the item well. In my case, the undulating card required something to support it underneath and to keep the mold-making material from going under the item. I kneaded clay, formed it into logs, and pressed it firmly underneath the piece to secure it and make sure it was well connected with no air gaps. The clay was about 1/3 inch thick in the lowest places. I pressed the clay to the shelf, and with a knife, trimmed off any excess clay so it was straight-sided. This will be the sides of my chocolate mold later.</p> <p>I then rubbed a small amount of petroleum jelly all over the surface of the plaque. Some items come out of molds perfectly and some struggle. The jelly helps the item release from the mold later. I always use it because if it doesn’t come out, I’ve wasted time and product. Silicone isn’t reusable, so it can be very costly to make mistakes. Take caution and use only as much petroleum jelly as needed. Too much can stop silicone from curing. Using a hairdryer or heat gun, gently heat the surface that has the jelly applied to get it into all the crevices, and then using a clean paper towel, remove any excess, leaving only a very thin coat. This step is most important for items with a lot of small detail.</p> <p><img alt="setting the chocolate mold" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/custom%20mold%20setting%20web.jpg" class="align-right" />Using L-brackets, I formed a box around the piece, with about a half-inch around it. Then, I rolled more thin logs of clay and secured them around the outside of the brackets on the board, pressing firmly to make the edges where they meet the board as air-tight as possible. This is security against the thin mold-making materials seeping out from underneath before it's had the chance to set.</p> <p>My piece is ready to go. If you use a smaller piece and you are going to try the pint container or some other kind of container you have on hand, you only need to secure the positive to the bottom. You can use clay, like I do, or there are products you can buy to anchor it to the base and the petroleum jelly can work, too. If you don’t need the piece again, you can use cool temperature hot glue, but the item has to be secured. If it isn’t, when the liquid material pours over, the piece will move and float, and the mold will not work.</p> <p>Once the piece is completely ready, I can prepare the material. ComposiMold material can be melted in a pot on a stove or in the microwave. I heat it slowly over medium-low heat until no lumps remain. For this product, heating should be done in a well-ventilated area. I stir while it's heating but not too much. Over-stirring can add air bubbles that will ruin the final mold.</p> <p>I like to get on a step stool to pour. The extra height gives me an advantage. I pour from a height in a very thin stream. The thin stream, with the help of gravity, will help pull out any bubbles that may have been incorporated during heating. I pour into a corner of the prepared mold box without moving around. When I stay in one place and pour slowly, the material fills all available areas efficiently. I pour enough material to have at least 1/4 inch on top of the piece. For my undulating piece, I needed much more material to get all areas covered and then have an even level on top.</p> <p>I allow this to cool and set. The beauty of this product is that I have the mold very fast. It's not material that will last a long time, so if you’re planning on making a mold that will be used over and over, this is not the product to use. But for quick turnaround, lots of detail and a product that can be remelted and used again, this is a great option.</p> <p>Once the mold is set, I remove the mold box or cut away the plastic container. Turning it upside down, I remove the clay and carefully peel back the mold, away from my positive. I wash it gently in soap and water, let it air dry or use the hairdryer to help. As this material is sensitive to heat, I don’t want to use too much here. Chocolate is fine, caramel is not. Towels or paper towels can leave debris that can get into the final product so air drying is best. I keep the clay, which can be reused.</p> <p><img alt="custom chocolate bar" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/final%20custom%20chocolate%20bar.jpg" class="align-right" />Now the mold is ready to use for tempered chocolate, fondant, gum paste or modeling chocolate. My final piece is poured dark chocolate, freeze-dried raspberries, airbrushed raspberry color and hand-painted dots to meet the client's brief.</p> <p>Having tricks like this in your toolbox means you can create whatever fantastical ideas you have and reproduce things that would otherwise be impossible with standard methods. Stand out from the competition by creating truly unique pieces that only you bring to life.</p> <p><em>Study sugar art with Chef Penny in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://ice.edu/art-of-cake-decorating-info" target="_blank">The Art of Cake Decorating at ICE.</a></em></p> Sugar Art Cake Decorating Cake Pastry Arts ICE Instructors <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23636&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="vrOmkiX80tZIo6WbEXKUP9WOf1Swsyf_uQI16UHVfpc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Sat, 25 Sep 2021 14:03:19 +0000 aday 23636 at https://www.ice.edu A Veteran Opens His Mind to Vegan Cooking and Baking https://www.ice.edu/blog/veteran-career-changer-pursues-pastry <span>A Veteran Opens His Mind to Vegan Cooking and Baking</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79461" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ablustein</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/09/2021 - 11:29</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/reinicke%20header.jpeg?itok=hBg6-t2P Andrew Reinicke&#039;s Journey from the Army to Culinary School <time datetime="2021-09-15T12:00:00Z">September 15, 2021</time> Kiri Tannenbaum — Director of Culinary Relations <p>Inspired by his maternal grandfather, a Vietnam War veteran-turned-cook, former Army officer Andrew Reinicke (Health-Supportive, '21) found his true calling at the Institute of Culinary Education.</p> <p>The oldest of nine children, Andrew has always associated food with bonding. He remembers that his paternal grandmother, who grew up on a dairy farm in South Dakota and moved to Southern California to open a chain of creameries, was perpetually in the kitchen. “It was her joy to serve food and my fondest memories are sitting around my grandparents’ kitchen table, eating, playing cards and connecting.”</p> <p>After excelling at theater and debate in high school in San Diego, Andrew, wasn’t sure what he wanted to do. “People told me I was passionate about politics, but there was something special about human beings and food, and that intrigued me from an early age,” he says.</p> <p>He majored in political science at UCLA and then moved to Washington, D.C. to work at a think tank. Eventually, he joined a former classmate teaching U.S. history at a high school until he was compelled by a duty to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps and join the Army at age 30.</p> <p><em>Learn more about <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/losangeles/admissions-financial-aid/military-veterans" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">post-military career training at ICE.</a></em></p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Andrew Reinicke plating a pastry at ICE" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Andrew%20Reinicke%20in%20pastry%20class.jpeg" /><figcaption>Andrew Reinicke plating a pastry at ICE</figcaption></figure><p>Andrew went to Officer Candidate School after enlisting. As an officer, he handled supply chain logistics for weaponry, munitions and equipment, getting “beans and bullets” where they needed to be. He received permission to pursue a doctoral degree at Claremont Graduate University in political philosophies but faced a challenge.</p> <p>Andrew was diagnosed with epilepsy, causing him to withdraw from his program at Claremont and be processed out of the military. Fortunately, Andrew’s family, friends and faith got him through this difficult time. The military also provided recreational therapy to help guide Andrew on his new path. Ultimately, he came to a positive discovery.</p> <p>“What made me happy wasn’t the recreational therapy, it was cooking,” he says. Unsure about what to do next with that information, he headed to church and prayed. While kneeling, images began to appear, from mustard seeds to the Last Supper.</p> <p>“All of these different parables of Jesus of Nazareth came to mind,” he recalls. “They were all centered around food and that was my answer. It was very powerful.” Andrew had clarity that cooking was his professional path. “It wasn’t just a career; it was a vocation. It was something I was supposed to be doing,” he says, deciding to commute from San Diego to check out ICE’s Los Angeles campus.</p> <p>“The regulation of my schedule has helped even with basic things like sleeping," he says. "It’s really just given me a purpose and a drive that I was lacking ever since the military. School gave that to me."</p> <h2>Culinary School in Los Angeles</h2> <p>Though one of his main passions is pastry, managing his epilepsy pushed Andrew to become a healthier person, leading him to study <a href="https://www.ice.edu/losangeles/career-programs/natural-gourmet-center" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Health-Supportive Culinary Arts</a> at ICE. The program helped him understand the healing power of food.</p> <p>“That really opened my eyes,” he says. “Food has traditionally been seen as medicine. You can integrate East and West for health reasons and it can be tasty and fun.”</p> <p><figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Vegan shepherd's pie" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/reinicke%20web.jpeg" /><figcaption>Vegan shepherd's pie and vegan French onion soup</figcaption></figure></p> <p>For his final menu, Andrew tapped into his interest in history and connection to the military by creating a vegan shepherd's pie and vegan French onion soup. “It was a nod back to a time when Scotland and France were military allies, called the Auld Alliance,” he says. “If you had told me two years ago that I would be considering veganism, let alone vegetarianism, I would have laughed in your face. I have learned so much by having an open mind.”</p> <p>Andrew completed his externship by working as a prep cook at Oceanside Kitchen Collaborative, feeding nutritious meals to community members who need it most while practicing zero waste. He’s since returned to ICE for the <a href="https://www.ice.edu/losangeles/career-programs/pastry-baking-arts" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts</a> program.</p> <p>“That was originally what I wanted to do, baking and pastry,” he says. “ICE met and exceeded my expectations for culinary school.”</p> <p>Andrew, who’s part Irish, dreams of opening a hospitality business in Ireland and hopes knowing the science behind pastry will come in handy.</p> <p>“The culinary world is so diverse that there definitely are places for me, whether in food writing or education or the bed and breakfast with the cookery school or a café,” he says. “What I do know is, I’m doing what I’m supposed to be doing. I’m on the right path.”</p> <p><em>Follow your food path with a <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">career program at ICE.</a></em></p> Military &amp; Veterans Health-Supportive Culinary Arts Pastry Arts Baking Arts Los Angeles Career Changer <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23541&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="jhSO0RuDNsqcZ_8K0ZMM9Jh7RgDAZUOCuupxkUjszS8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Thu, 09 Sep 2021 15:29:45 +0000 ablustein 23541 at https://www.ice.edu The Ultimate Birthday Cake Techniques https://www.ice.edu/blog/explosion-cake <span>The Ultimate Birthday Cake Techniques</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/01/2021 - 11:11</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/birthday%20cake%20header.jpg?itok=k5DHB7-6 Chef Penny demonstrates professional piping with a surprise inside. <time datetime="2021-09-01T12:00:00Z">September 1, 2021</time> Penny Stankiewicz — Chef-Instructor, Pastry &amp; Baking Arts, The Art of Cake Decorating <p>On the latest episode of Epicurious' 4 Levels series, Art of Cake Decorating Chef-Instructor Penny Stankiewicz demonstrates elevating birthday cake by piping buttercream flowers and baking candy inside for the ultimate surprise.</p> <p>Chef Penny has more than 15 years of professional pastry experience. After graduating from the Institute of Culinary Education and working at Spice Market, she opened custom cake bakery Sugar Couture in 2004 and has taught cake decorating since 2014.</p> <p>For Epicurious' birthday cake episode, she uses a white cake, vanilla and chocolate icing, colored buttercream flowers and edible glitter — plus assorted sprinkles inside.</p> <p>Watch her demonstrate cake decorating in the video and get each recipe below.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/imXIizmWd14?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/continuing-ed/art-cake-decorating" target="_blank">Explore the Art of Cake Decorating at ICE's New York campus.</a></p> <h5>Happy Birthday Cake</h5> <p><em>Yields 1 8-inch cake</em></p> <h5>White Cake</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>230 grams egg whites</li> <li>420 grams whole milk</li> <li>20 grams vanilla bean paste</li> <li>255 grams cake flour</li> <li>255 grams all-purpose flour</li> <li>540 grams white sugar</li> <li>23 grams baking powder</li> <li>2 teaspoons salt</li> <li>319 grams butter</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Combine egg whites, milk and vanilla bean paste. Mix to incorporate.</li> <li>Combine both flours sugar, baking powder and salt in the bowl of the kitchen aid mixer. Place on the mixer with the paddle attachment and mix to combine.</li> <li>Add butter that is very soft, but still in solid form, in pieces in mixer with half of the milk mixture. Mix on medium speed until moist and no traces of butter remain.</li> <li>Mix additional 2 minutes to develop texture. Add the remaining milk mixture. After it's combined, mix on medium-low for another 2 minutes.</li> <li>Prepare four 8-inch-by-3-inch pans with pan spray and parchment. Add 3/4 inch of batter to each pan.</li> <li>Bake in a standard 350 F oven or 300 F for convection until the top springs back when you touch it and it doesn’t feel wet inside, between 20-25 minutes.</li> </ol><h5>Vanilla and Chocolate Icing</h5> <ul><li>634 grams confectioners sugar</li> <li>140 grams pasteurized egg white</li> <li>935 grams butter, softened</li> <li>3 grams salt</li> <li>20 grams vanilla bean paste</li> <li>160 grams 72% (very dark), Cluizel preferred</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>In a clean mixing bowl, combine confectioners sugar and egg whites. Whip on medium-low speed until a thick royal icing is created.</li> <li>Add softened butter in cubes, mixing until icing no longer appears broken.</li> <li>Add salt and vanilla.</li> <li>Stir in cooled melted chocolate if making the chocolate version.</li> <li>Separate icing in half and add melted chocolate to one half.</li> </ol><h3>Assembly</h3> <ul><li>1 pintt simple syrup</li> <li>1 cup St Germain</li> <li>1 pound sprinkles</li> <li>4 ounces edible glitter, white or clear</li> </ul><ol><li>Using ring cutters, cut a circle from the center of three of the cakes.</li> <li>Place one down on the cake board. Soak with St Germain syrup and pipe chocolate icing on top.</li> <li>Smooth with an offset spatula.</li> <li>Repeat this process with the other two cakes with holes punched out.</li> <li>Fill the center of the cake with sprinkles.</li> <li>Top with the final uncut layer.</li> <li>Apply a thin coating of icing as the crumb coat. Chill in the freezer for 15 minutes or in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.</li> <li>Apply a second, thicker coating of icing.</li> <li>Place glitter in a large bowl. Holding the cake in your nondominant hand, use your dominant hand to stroke the glitter onto the surface of the cake.</li> <li>Place the cake on your final presentation board with a dollop of icing to glue.</li> </ol><h5>Decorators Buttercream</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>16 ounces butter</li> <li>8 ounces shortening</li> <li>1 teaspoon salt</li> <li>48 ounces 10x</li> <li>3 tablespoons meringue powder</li> <li>4 1/2 fluid ounces milk</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Beat the butter and shortening with a paddle attachment to combine fully. There may still be a few small shortening lumps but they should be very small. Lower the speed add the meringue powder, salt and sugar. Beat until fully combined.</li> <li>Gradually add milk. Turn mixer to medium and beat until light and fluffy, about 6 minutes.</li> </ol><h5>Buttercream Flowers</h5> <p>Extra buttercream will be needed to create the flowers. A half batch of the original recipe will be enough. Keep the buttercream cool but soft enough — too soft and the flowers won’t hold their shape, too firm and it will stick in the tip.</p> <p>To color the buttercream, separate it into as many small bowls as you would like colors, having about a cup of icing in each bowl. I suggest one main color, two or three contrasting colors, and one green. Using gel paste food colors, preferably on the tip of a toothpick, add very small amounts and stir until the correct color is achieved and no streaks remain. Allow the icing to sit if you can before working with it, as the color will continue to develop. I used a rosy pink, lavender yellow and purple, along with an avocado green. The buttercream is slightly tinted yellow because of the butter added, so it will warm your colors some.</p> <p>Piping buttercream flowers is a skill that requires practice. For this cake, I piped roses, peonies, small yellow four blossom flowers and wisteria. I used 13-inch piping bags, with plastic couplers and rose tips of various sizes, from 102 to 104, and one large tip, a 128, with no coupler. Pipe the flowers onto a nail with a piece of parchment, and then chill the flowers to make it easy to place them. If they warm up too much while you’re working, pop them back in the refrigerator or freezer. The smaller ones will get soft very quickly so work fast. If piping flowers is a bit too challenging, try piping rosettes of various sizes and colors in similar ways and using those to create a flower-like feeling.</p> <p>Start by piping vines on the cake, where you think they will look nice. Use a small round tip or a tipless piping bag cutting only a small hole. To place the flowers, pipe a mound of icing, about 3 inches long, by about 1/2 inch high along one side of the cake, about three-quarters of an inch in from the edge. Place the largest most dominant flowers first and then fill the remaining areas with your smaller ones, working to keep a variance in color. Pipe the wisteria-type flower directly onto the cake, using the smallest rose tip. Save the small filler flowers for last, and use them to fill any spots that look empty. Finally, using a leaf tip of your choice, pipe leaves to fill in any raw spaces, to add contrasting green where it needs the color, and to add a bit more dimension.</p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/edible-flowers-for-cakes" target="_blank">Read more about working with flowers in pastry.</a></p> Cake Cake Decorating Baking Arts Desserts Video Recipe <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23521&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="h0jz9mWY2KUtYjtEshOaSAZqvCi8Fp6IotrE6afzU48"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Sep 2021 15:11:31 +0000 aday 23521 at https://www.ice.edu Claudia Fleming's Road Back to Union Square Hospitality Group https://www.ice.edu/blog/claudia-fleming-union-square-hospitality-group <span>Claudia Fleming&#039;s Road Back to Union Square Hospitality Group</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79461" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ablustein</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/24/2021 - 12:11</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/claudia%20fleming%20header.jpeg?itok=eTR4_d4Y Meet the executive pastry director. <time datetime="2021-09-01T12:00:00Z">September 1, 2021</time> Andrew Blustein — Content Manager <p>After selling the North Fork Table and writing a second cookbook, ICE alum Claudia Fleming (Culinary, ’88) is back at Union Square Hospitality Group as executive pastry director, a newly created role.</p> <p>Claudia Fleming’s winding food road, from over-the-top pastries in the '80s and '90s to writing her second cookbook in a Long Island cottage, has landed her back where it all began with Union Square Hospitality Group (USHG) as executive pastry director.</p> <p>She first started working in kitchens while pursuing a career in dance, but at age 29 decided to fully commit to cooking and enroll at the Institute of Culinary Education, then called Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School (Claudia and her classmates called the school PKU: Peter Kump University). Back then it was in a two-kitchen brownstone on East 92nd Street. “I remember being over-the-moon enthusiastic about going to school every day,” she says. “It was a happy time for me. Just learning and absorbing all that new information was very exciting.”</p> <p>Claudia started on the savory side of the menu — and at some high-profile New York restaurants. In 1984 she was working at Jams, Jonathan Waxman’s restaurant that brought California cuisine to the East Coast. Then she had a stage at <a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/drew-nieporent-new-york-city-restaurant-industry-coronavirus">Drew Nieporent’s</a> Montrachet and, while attending ICE, worked at Union Square Cafe, her entry into Danny Meyer’s restaurant group.</p> <p>One summer she needed a break, so she went to Aspen, Colorado for some time off. When she came back to Union Square Cafe, then-chef Michael Romano said the only spot available was assisting the pastry chef. Claudia wouldn’t pass up an opportunity to learn something new.</p> <p>“I did that and then I just never looked back. It was a great experience for me working right next to the pastry chef. Just the two of us together is a rare experience,” she says.</p> <p>Now Claudia’s come full circle at Union Square Hospitality, except this time she’s leading pastry development for the entire restaurant group. She rotates between restaurants, dedicating time in each kitchen. Right now she’s at soon-to-open Ci Siamo, an Italian restaurant with a wood-fired hearth oven where Claudia is working on something she hasn’t done before: Italian desserts.</p> <p><img alt="Claudia Fleming" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/claudia%20fleming%20web_0.jpeg" class="align-right" /></p> <p>“While I'm not literally cooking in the hearth, I'm smoking nuts to garnish a dessert with, and I will probably roast some fruit that will go with desserts,” Claudia says, thinking of what she’ll include on the menu. “It's another element to be able to play with, to be able to put into my toolbox, so that's fun.”</p> <p>Claudia says her cooking style skews more toward simple, comforting dishes through which the ingredients get to shine. That’s in stark contrast to her early days of pastry in the '80s and '90s when staffed-up restaurants were throwing multiple sets of hands into desserts, building tall edible structures showered in gold leaf. Claudia remembers a high-end New York restaurant scene enamored by fantastical desserts, investing in people and equipment to make them happen, which was “super cool and moved the industry forward but not sustainable.”</p> <p>Now she says pastry departments are generally smaller and desserts are often less intricate. Those smaller kitchens, plus the rise of home bakers starting their own small businesses over the last 18 months, have made <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/continuing-ed/advanced-pastry-studies" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">pastry programs</a> all the more important, Claudia says.</p> <p>“If you're going to work in a smaller company or for yourself, then culinary school is a necessity,” she says. “It's very hard to create in a vacuum. Working at home by yourself is so challenging. If that's how you choose to go, then I would say cooking school is a must.”</p> <p>Claudia experienced some of that struggle while working on her second cookbook. After selling her acclaimed restaurant and inn, North Fork Table, in January of 2020, she remembers writing it while holed up in her Long Island kitchen cottage. Finished with her book and back in New York City, she says she’s happy to be focused again on making desserts.</p> <p>And when the ICE alum isn’t writing, she’s often reading. Claudia says aspiring chefs should do the same, pushing students to know their food history.</p> <p>“Know who Maida Heatter is. Know who Jacque Torres is. Know who Francois Payard is. Read 'Larousse [Patisserie and Baking]',” Claudia says. “Just read, and read about technique. Know the history of the craft. It's important to know where these things come from, and it's very inspirational, too.”</p> <p>Overall, she hopes future pastry chefs will “read more and look at pictures less” because something can look great on a screen but not taste great on the plate. “It's really about what it tastes like,” she says.</p> <p><em>Pursue a career in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/career-programs/school-pastry-baking-arts" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts at ICE</a>.</em></p> Pastry Arts Baking Arts Alumni Cookbooks New York City <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23481&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="0agrR8ULtGaM9zI2luNBKGKL3goCA1kG-MKma6l5nS4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 24 Aug 2021 16:11:19 +0000 ablustein 23481 at https://www.ice.edu A Pastry Chef's Guide to Working with Flowers https://www.ice.edu/blog/edible-flowers-for-cakes <span>A Pastry Chef&#039;s Guide to Working with Flowers</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Sun, 08/01/2021 - 13:17</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/pastry%20flower%20header.jpg?itok=aSb2ZX2A Here&#039;s how to incorporate edible flowers in cakes, cookies, bonbons and plated desserts. <time datetime="2021-08-03T12:00:00Z">August 3, 2021</time> Jürgen David — Director of Pastry Research and Development <p>Director of Pastry Research and Development Jürgen David shares a dozen ways he's working with flowers at the Institute of Culinary Education, from growing edible flowers in the hydroponic garden to shaping, hand painting and infusing in Pastry &amp; Baking Arts.</p> <p>Take a look around you right now. There are flowers everywhere: on phone cases, t-shirts, notebooks, water bottles, pencils. Maybe you have some on your desk or in your window. How about your food? Are there flowers there?</p> <p>In pastry making, there are many ways we use flowers — often as a design element, but you can also hit the jackpot and create a food item with them.</p> <p>At ICE there are many opportunities to not only use fresh flowers from our <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/explore-ice/hydroponic-garden" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">hydroponic garden</a>, but we also introduce students to many different ways to create delicious blooms, blossoms and outstanding beauties. Let me take you for a tour through the world of edible flowers.</p> <h2><img alt="Chef Jürgen with a birthday cake" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/jurgen%20happy%20birthday%20cake%20web.jpg" class="align-right" />Edible Roses</h2> <p>Marzipan is made from almonds and sugar, a delicious paste that lends itself to shaping roses. I would consider this one a birthday-cake classic.</p> <p>Here you take small rounds of marzipan, flatten them into petals (I use a firm bowl scraper) and bend them ever so gently to create the little buds, and then keep adding petals for a fuller rose. Give your roses some little green marzipan leaves, put the roses on a cake and I can already hear you sing “Happy Birthday!”</p> <h2>Modeling Chocolate Flowers</h2> <p>This type of modeling paste is made from melted chocolate and sugar syrup and does not dry as hard or solid as tempered chocolate, so shaping while pliable is key. It will eventually dry firm after a day or two.</p> <p>Formed the same way as the marzipan rose, but with this you can create thinner edges on the petals. Timing is important as handling it too much will make the modeling chocolate too soft. If you wait too long, it will be hard and dull. Getting this right will make them nice and shiny.</p> <p><img alt="Modeling chocolate flowers" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/modeling%20chocolate%20flowers.JPG" class="align-right" /></p> <h2>Flower Sugar Cookies</h2> <p>Flood them with royal icing (confectioner’s sugar with egg whites), paint on them or use royal icing and the brush embroidery technique for this classic look.</p> <p>I played around with this — baking cookies, outlining with royal icing and flooding the area with a thinner royal icing — quite a bit because it’s really fun, but patience is required to continue because the icing needs to dry between steps. I’ve painted flowers with undiluted gel food coloring before or used thick royal icing in a paper cornet (the pastry chef’s secret weapon) and a slightly wet brush to draw lines that mimic embroidery. I’ve also played around with adhering a patiently dried cutting and it is a picture of perfection, especially if you have lots of flowers to choose from, like I do.</p> <p><img alt="Flower sugar cookies" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/flower%20sugar%20cookies%20web.JPG" class="align-center" /></p> <h2>Silicone Flower Molds</h2> <p>Simply pop the modeling paste of your choice in some adorable silicone molds and get immediate results!</p> <p>Using fondant, marzipan or whatever paste you have on hand, simply press into the mold (I like to use a weighed amount for consistency and precision as well as speed) and unmold it right away. Flowers like these are ready in a flash. Try marbleizing or layering for different effects. To prevent sticking, a small amount of vegetable shortening or cornstarch can be dabbed into the mold. Less is more here. To create something really shiny, use a fancy luster dust. The only drawback here is that everything looks the same. However, cutting the molded pieces or trimming part of it can help get something unique.</p> <p><img alt="silicone flower molds" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/silicon%20mold%20flower%20web.jpg" class="align-center" /></p> <h2>Buttercream Flowers</h2> <p>With the flick of a wrist and the right piping tip these flowers made with decorator's buttercream can be conjured up in no time. </p> <p>The right recipe and correct consistency for piping these are keys for me. Having little parchment squares on top of your flower “nail” is a neat way to work on one flower at a time, and it allows you to quickly move your masterpieces to safety.</p> <p>There are so many different piping tips to use, so give them all a try. Play with the angle you use to hold the bag Also, do not fill your bag too much; not only is it heavy to hold, but your hands will melt the buttercream! (Warm buttercream will also have a plasticky, translucent look that I do not care for.) Keeping the piped flowers in the freezer makes it easy to place them on your cakes.</p> <h2>Tempered Chocolate Flowers</h2> <p>Shiny and delicate petals glued with great care and patience result in lookers like these.</p> <p><img alt="Tempered chocolate" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/tempered%20chocolate%20web.jpg" class="align-right" />This flower will require more skill and a few nifty tools from the hardware store as well as knowing how to temper chocolate. One way to make the petals would be to spread a thin layer of tempered chocolate over a strip of acetate (plastic sheets make for shiny texture since it’s non-porous), wait for the cutting stage, cut triangles, bend chocolate-side-up into a mold and let set completely. Make a sphere for the center, attach the petals starting around the middle, adding more of them as you make new rows. I would describe attaching these in the way a pine cone has its scales. Flip it right-side-up and gently place it where it needs to go. This not only looks impressive but also — YUM!</p> <h2>Flower Infusions</h2> <p>Fresh flowers or their respective parts — even when they are dried — can pump up your flavor immensely. Infuse them into cream or butter, add to bread or cookie doughs and harvest all that flavor.</p> <h2>Pressed Flowers</h2> <p>These take patience, careful picking, placement for pressing and time for drying, but the result is satisfying and glorious — a thing of beauty to behold.</p> <p>I use paper towels around my blossoms to create this vintage effect. I found, however, that the paper towels I used made a difference in the outcome. Some of my paper towels left a ribbed texture on my precious flowers that absolutely would not do!</p> <p>After gently arranging the flowers, I used my fattest and heaviest cookbooks (if you have a copy of “Larousse Gastronomique” handy...) for maximum pressure, then I set them aside for weeks. To have the flowers truly dry will take some time, and the humidity of a pesky New York City summer was not my friend for expediting this step. During my research, I even saw some pressed flower kits for use in a microwave oven, but the old-fashioned glamour of using books is more my style. Patience is a virtue, after all. If I can wait for the flowers to grow, I can wait for the flowers to dry.</p> <p><img alt="Pressed flowers" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/pressed%20flowers%20in%20book%20web.JPG" class="align-center" /></p> <h2>Fresh Flowers for Decor on Plated Desserts</h2> <p>Don’t have time to dry or press them? Try picking some to decorate your cakes or dishes. It’s amazing how the petals, leaves or even the pollen can enhance both your presentation and the flavor!</p> <p><img alt="Fresh flowers for decor on plated desserts" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/fresh%20flowers%20for%20decor%20web.JPG" class="align-right" />There’s no waiting here! Get them while they're fresh and at their peak, and place where it pleases the eye!</p> <p>For chocolate and sugar showpieces, I tried using freshly picked flowers as well as pressed ones. I tried to make them part of the cast design pieces, and I’m still trying to figure out some steps to achieve the look I’m going for. Making the flowers stay in place is a challenge. Hot sugar syrup makes them wilt and discolor. Stay tuned for more on that technique in a future blog post.</p> <h2>Sugar Paste Flowers</h2> <p>This skill requires the most patience. There is a rabbit hole of tools and gadgets to shop for — don’t buy it just because it’s shiny! With added vegetable gums, this sugar paste can create the most realistic-looking flowers. The gums in the recipe allow the paste to dry into a porcelain-like state (leaving them very fragile and affected by humidity). The steps range wildly for the flower you are trying to replicate, so I’ll let the pictures do the talking. Just know that waiting for the pieces to dry takes patience and planning.</p> <p><img alt="Sugar paste flowers" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/sugar%20paste%20flower%20web.jpg" class="align-center" /></p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/sugar-pulling-with-isomalt" target="_blank">How to Use Isomalt for Pulled Sugar Flowers</a></p> <h2>Growing Edible Flowers</h2> <p>Nothing beats growing your own flowers and the satisfaction of harvesting them yourself. I picked and planted the following new flowers with our farm manager, <a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/hydroponic-gardening" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Caleb Raff</a>:</p> <p><strong>Red Clover</strong></p> <p>These came up really quick. Have you ever tried the center ends of the blossom’s petals? Fresh clover nectar is divine. This flower did not need much babysitting — just don’t call them a weed!</p> <p><strong>Primrose</strong></p> <p>I chose these because they grew in my grandmother’s garden. This specific variety is in the edible flowers category. These grow very slowly and aren’t ready, but we are not sure if they’ve been grown hydroponically before. Because they are perennials, they might take longer than originally thought. Time will tell.</p> <p><strong>Chamomile</strong></p> <p>Elegant and classic, they grew pretty quickly. And wow, they are tall! They also have the tiniest seeds I’ve ever seen. (When planting in the farm only one seed goes in per pod and you have to use tweezers.) They need to be pruned a bit so they will keep flowering.</p> <p><img alt="Chamomile and bon bons" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/chamomile%20and%20bon%20bons%20web.JPG" class="align-right" /></p> <p><strong>English Daisies</strong></p> <p>After some pH adjustments of the water and a new swath of real estate for our typically biennial beauties, they are on the path to perfection. I, for one, am looking forward to seeing them thrive. They are starting to come along now.</p> <h2>Pro Tips</h2> <p><strong>A few things to keep in mind when working with edible flowers:</strong></p> <p>Not all flowers are edible. Make sure to check before using or eating a plant. Just because it’s pretty does not mean it’s safe. Introduce fresh flowers into your diet slowly as you would with any new food.</p> <p>No pesticides! No chemicals! Know your source. Flowers growing next to the road would be a hard no.</p> <p><strong>Freshly Cut Flowers vs. Store Bought vs. Dried</strong></p> <p>Fresh is fresh. Other than wilting and oxidation, fresh flowers will have their full potential when it comes to flavor and looks. Fresh edible flowers at the store might already be a week old by the time you buy them (think about shipping alone). Dried flowers, like any dried food items, will have a great shelf life and are a sure way to have some on hand for when they are out of season. The flavor profiles will have changed, however (think about herbal teas), so taste them first to adjust your recipes.</p> <p>Excited about flowers? Try using them in a dish or making a dish that’s shaped like one. Share your creations in the comments below or with us on social media @iceculinary. <a href="https://www.ice.edu/request-info" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Schedule a tour</a> of our New York City campus here in downtown Manhattan to check out our hydroponic garden in person! I know I will keep using flowers and finding fun and delicious things to do with them, as long as they keep growing.</p> <h2>Ganache Filling</h2> <p>Flavor, BABY! Use freshly picked flowers to infuse the cream portion of a bonbon ganache. This chamomile-infused filling was a hit.</p> <p>Here is the recipe we created in class with my inaugural chamomile from the farm. Clearly, these are not shaped flowers, but a way to utilize the deliciousness of fresh flowers to make this luscious ganache. (I am not stopping you from finding a flower-shaped bonbon mold!)</p> <h5>Chamomile Ganache Filling</h5> <p><em>Yields about 450 grams</em></p> <ul><li>135 grams heavy cream</li> <li>10 chamomile flowers, fresh from the garden</li> <li>1/4 scraped vanilla bean</li> <li>30 grams invert sugar or honey</li> <li>260 grams white chocolate, melted</li> <li>30 grams unsalted butter, en pommade (softened)</li> </ul> <ol><li>Place the cream, chamomile flowers (their petals and leaves only), vanilla bean and invert sugar in a saucepan. Heat to infuse, and let steep for five minutes.</li> <li>Strain the cream mixture and discard the chamomile and vanilla bean; reheat the cream (without boiling it) and add to the chocolate. Stir the mixture with a small whisk in small circles, working from the inside of the mass toward the outside until incorporated. The resulting ganache should have a smooth, pudding-like texture with a glossy shine. Take your time with this step.</li> <li>Allow the ganache to cool to 35 C (95 F). Stir in the butter.</li> <li>TASTE IT!!!</li> <li>For bonbons, deposit the ganache directly into the pre-cast molds with a pastry bag. Take care to not overfill. Allow a small space to provide a sealing base and allow the centers to set at room temperature before applying the tempered chocolate seal.</li> <li>Let the tempered chocolate set and contract completely before unmolding.</li> <li>Using a parchment-lined half sheet pan, carefully invert the mold to release the finished bonbons. This may require a slight tap, or, in some cases, the molds may require a brief chill in order to achieve full contraction and release.</li> </ol><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pVseIgVLlX4?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info" target="_blank">Study Pastry &amp; Baking Arts with Chef Jürgen and his flowers.</a></p> Hydroponic Garden Pastry Arts Baking Arts Plant-Based Farm to Table Cake Decorating <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23356&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="uuZ3--D8vSalqZjMemrfc06TCRtIZmm5Swxp4sLNlbM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Sun, 01 Aug 2021 17:17:57 +0000 aday 23356 at https://www.ice.edu Meet Chef Sohrob Esmaili https://www.ice.edu/blog/chef-sohrob-esmaili <span>Meet Chef Sohrob Esmaili</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79461" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ablustein</span></span> <span>Mon, 07/19/2021 - 13:57</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/chef%20sohrob%20header.jpeg?itok=ljiNiC5u The pastry chef went right to culinary school after high school and never looked back. <time datetime="2021-07-20T12:00:00Z">July 20, 2021</time> Kiri Tannenbaum — Director of Culinary Relations <p>Pastry &amp; Baking Arts Chef-Instructor Sohrob Esmaili trained at Jean-Georges and Gramercy Tavern before moving to San Francisco to open the Proper Hotel’s eateries and conquering the Food Network show, Spring Baking Championship.</p> <p>California-native Sohrob Esmaili had a penchant for cuisine from a young age. “I was really into baking and cooking as a teen, and I would bring things I prepared at home to school,” Chef Sohrob says. His culinary gifts — from lasagna to cinnamon rolls to cheesecake — were welcome by all, especially his teachers. That positive reinforcement encouraged Chef Sohrob to continue to shower his educators with food, all while his mother identified a potential career path for her son.</p> <p>Aware of his aptitude in gastronomy, Chef Sohrob’s mother suggested he attend culinary school to learn the craft. At age 17, he graduated from high school and a week later began his pastry studies at Le Cordon Bleu in Pasadena. “I was a little scared to leave the house and move far away at a young age,” he says, referring to his decision to remain in Southern California.</p> <p>While at Le Cordon Bleu he often sought the advice of his chef-instructors, which included <a href="https://www.ice.edu/losangeles/explore-ice/faculty-profiles/herve-guillard" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Chef Herve Guillard</a>, who’s now the Director of Education and Lead Chef of Pastry &amp; Baking Arts at ICE's Los Angeles campus. As Chef Sohrob’s program neared an end, he decided to further his education at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, where he focused on savory cuisine for his bachelor’s degree in Hospitality and Culinary Arts. However, his deep interest in pastry persisted, and early on he returned to focus on baking. “It was a relief to switch back to pastry,” Chef Sohrob says. “Everyone in the class was super passionate, and everyone in pastry really wanted to be there.”</p> <p>Interested in fine dining, Chef Sohrob completed his externship at the esteemed Jean-Georges restaurant in Manhattan under Executive Pastry Chef Johnny Iuzzini. “It was a very high-strung environment, but I learned a lot,” he says. The 14-hour days were long and yet the training prepared him for his next position as pastry chef at Tribeca’s The Harrison, where he took on more of a leadership role.</p> <p>When the restaurant closed, Chef Sohrob moved on to the legendary Gramercy Tavern, where he was part of a large pastry department that worked on chocolates, breads, pastries, custards, ice creams and more. He was eventually promoted to sous chef at the restaurant, but California was calling and Chef Sohrob decided it was time to return to his home state.</p> <p><img alt="Chef Sohrab in class" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Chef%20Sohrab%20Esmaili%20web.jpg" class="align-right" />In 2019 he joined the pastry program at the Proper Hotel in San Francisco where he created the menus for the property’s cafe, bar, restaurant and lounge. “We developed an in-house bread program where we made our own burger buns, sandwich rolls, bread and even cultured our own butter,” he says. There, the pastry kitchen cranked out croissants and danishes for the café, and for the lounge, Chef Sohrob developed Mexican-inspired items including churros with tequila-infused chocolate dipping sauce and bourbon budino (a custard or pudding). “I got very assertive and I wanted to fill up all of our venues with pastries,” he says.</p> <p>When Chef Sohrob learned of an opportunity to compete in Food Network’s “Spring Baking Championship,” he embraced the challenge. “I was happy to go and be in a room surrounded by bakers and pastry chefs that knew what I was talking about,” he says. To prepare for the competition, he timed himself while attempting mock baking challenges. The vetting process was rigorous and included the show’s producers combing through social media accounts and studying Chef Sohrob’s portfolio. At the end of the day, all of the preparation paid off, as Chef Sohrob was crowned the winner of the series. The humble chef says, “Every week I was prepared to go home, and then I wouldn’t lose!”</p> <p>After the show aired, COVID-19 hit and the Proper Hotel’s dining rooms came to a standstill. Fortunately, having stayed in touch with his mentors from his school days, Chef Sohrob reconnected with Dean of Students Herve Guillard, who suggested he apply to teach at ICE’s Los Angeles campus.</p> <p>Chef Sohrob joined ICE in the spring of 2021 and has already made an impression on the students in the pastry and culinary arts programs. One student recently stopped him in the hallway to let him know how he had opened her eyes to the world of pastry. Chef Sohrob attributes her response to his style of teaching and the one-on-one attention he enjoys with students.</p> <p>One of his favorite things to teach thus far is viennoiserie, as he believes it is a lesson on time management. “There are breaks between turns and you must find projects to fill in the time,” he says. “There are always side projects or ways to prepare for tomorrow; you have to do what is necessary.”</p> <p>His advice for students, no matter what path they pursue, is to always be comfortable and remain calm. “You need to have a plan and be organized,” he says. “You have to be comfortable or your food will not come out well. The stress will show in your work. Be confident in your abilities, be proud of where you are and what you’ve done, and keep going.”</p> <p>Study with Chef Sohrob in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info" target="_blank">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts at ICE.</a></p> Pastry Arts Baking Arts Los Angeles ICE Instructors <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23281&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="u0OsdX9TopnbJ1REhMBrTpSMbXEoIZqxOLFm7YkviBk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Mon, 19 Jul 2021 17:57:23 +0000 ablustein 23281 at https://www.ice.edu How is Flour Made? https://www.ice.edu/blog/fresh-milled-flour <span>How is Flour Made?</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Fri, 07/16/2021 - 09:57</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/flour%20header_1.jpg?itok=tMMm6oDE Pastry Chef Rory Macdonald evaluates whether to mill his own flour. <time datetime="2021-07-23T12:00:00Z">July 23, 2021</time> Rory Macdonald — ICE Chef <p>For a recent project, I have been looking at buying a flour mill and milling flour, but before investing, I wanted to know what the real differences are between fresh milled and store or purveyor-purchased flour. Is it worth the effort? Can you taste it? Is it better for you and does it affect how you use the flour in a recipe?</p> <p>Firstly, let's identify what flour is. It’s amazing to me how many people have no idea where flour comes from or how it’s made.</p> <h2>Types of Wheat</h2> <p>There are six classes of wheat — within which are around 30,000 varieties.</p> <ul><li>Hard Red Winter</li> <li>Hard Red Spring</li> <li>Hard White Winter</li> <li>Durum</li> <li>Soft White Winter</li> <li>Soft White Spring</li> </ul><p>The first four are most commonly used among bread bakers as the soft wheats have a lower proportion of protein and a higher proportion of starch than the hard varieties, which would be more applicable for pastries and other baked items, as they do not require the highly developed gluten structure that bread requires.</p> <p>There are more than 54 million acres of wheat planted all over the United States. Adaptability allows the crop to be planted and cultivated in all different types of climate.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GCWoX3VYtoU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <h2>Milling Flour</h2> <p>Once the wheat has been harvested it goes through a process called sweating before it gets milled. This process takes six weeks and creates small metabolic changes in the wheat berries that will improve the milling quality of the grain. The process will typically reduce the moisture content from 17-18% to around 13-14% after that time.</p> <p>The next step is to put the wheat through a form of quality control to remove any foreign bodies, stones, sticks, stray grains, etc., followed by tempering, whereby moisture is added to the grain in the form of chlorinated water. This helps with the separation of the grain and stops any bacterial or microbial growth. In the U.S., the length of tempering time is around six hours, mainly due to the need for mass production. In Europe, more traditional methods typically temper the wheat for 24–48 hours.</p> <p>Once tempering is complete, the wheat berries are ready to be milled and then sifted or bolted. The more the grain is milled, the smaller the grain gets, the more flour is obtained through the sifting process. From 100 pounds of grain, the flour yield will be around 75% extraction. The leftover bran and germ is generally used for animal feed. Whole wheat flour, for example, is 100% extraction, hence the color and flaked with bran particles.</p> <h2>Types of Mills</h2> <ul><li><strong>Stone mills</strong> feature two large stones fixed to a platform. As the top stone turns it grinds the grain into pieces. The size of the grain is determined by how close the two stones are together. The milled flour is then sifted to separate the bran, wheat germ and white flour (endosperm). This is probably the oldest form of milling and the most reliable for maintaining the grains' nutritional integrity.</li> <li><strong>Hammer mills</strong> use small metal hammers that repeatedly strike the grain in a closed chamber, pulverizing or shattering it into tiny pieces. Theoretically, the hammer mill is capable of creating a much finer powder than stone or roller mills. The milled flour is then sifted to separate the bran, wheat germ and white flour.</li> <li><strong>Roller mills</strong> feature two revolving corrugated steel rollers, crushing the grain and separating the bran and the germ from the endosperm. The milled flour is then sifted to separate the bran, wheat germ and white flour. This is the system most favored by the milling industry and probably responsible for a majority of flour available on the market.</li> </ul><p>Regardless of which system is used, all mills reconstitute the flour by adding back a percentage of the bran and wheat germ to the white flour to create whole wheat flour. Because the milled bran and wheat germ particles are too large for most bakers to use, they’ll run these through the mill again to break them down into smaller particles perhaps further reducing the nutritional value of the flour. This means you may be buying whole wheat flour but not necessarily whole grain.</p> <p>So what is the advantage of milling your own flour? Is it worth the effort? I spoke with <a href="https://www.instagram.com/simons_bread/" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Simon Bowden</a>, the head baker for Leaven &amp; Co., an artisanal bakery that produces bread for chefs in New York. Simon mills different kinds of wheat for various types of bread and explained that the seven main things to consider:</p> <ol><li>Flavor/taste.</li> <li>Nutrition.</li> <li>Choice/Provenance</li> <li>Storage.</li> <li>Equipment.</li> <li>Percentages.</li> <li>Mixing and proofing notes.</li> </ol><h2>Flavor</h2> <p>Of the many benefits of fresh milling your own wheat berries, flavor has to be No. 1 by far. After all, isn’t great flavor what we all want when all is said and done?</p> <p>When I first milled wheat berries in a small <a href="https://mockmill.us/shop/" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Mockmill</a> designed as an attachment for my stand mixer, I was completely blown away by the aromas that came from the flour. It was overwhelming. I had no idea that flour could smell like this. When you smell commercial whole wheat flour you usually get a nice, somewhat sweet, wheaty kind of smell, but the fresh milled is nutty, fruity, earthy, grassy, super fresh ... It reminded me of being close to a freshly cut wheat field or freshly mown lawn, intoxicating and addictive. And those aromas only gain intensity as you hydrate the flour and mix your doughs.</p> <p>Of course, this all translates directly to the overall taste or flavor, which in general is more complex, bolder, brighter, fresher and better than that of store-bought flour. Several people I know compare it to fresh grinding your own coffee beans. Once you smell the intense aromas of freshly ground coffee, let alone the flavor versus store-bought grinds, it's hard drink anything else. The same applies to the breads you can make using freshly milled flour.</p> <p>To put this into context, I’m generally using anywhere from 5%-30% fresh-milled whole grain in my bread.</p> <h2>Flour Nutrition</h2> <p>I’m certainly not an expert on the nutritional values of grains and flour, and I’m sure there are a lot of studies and research available that dig deeply into this area (and ICE Director of Nutrition <a href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/types-of-grain" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Celine Beitchman gets into grain here</a>). In general, we do know that freshly milled flours retain more of their vitamins, minerals and oils than aged flour. When the wheat berries are broken open at the mill, the resulting flour begins to immediately oxidize, which causes the nutrients to slowly start degrading. The longer it’s exposed to oxygen, the more loss of nutrients, as well as minerals and oils.</p> <h2>Flour Storage</h2> <p>Perhaps another advantage of fresh milling whole raw berries is the ability to store them for much longer periods of time than aged flour, especially whole grain flour. If whole berries are stored properly in a cool dry and dark place, they can last almost indefinitely, and that means at least 1-2 years, even much longer. Whereas aged or store-bought flours have a much shorter shelf life, especially whole wheat flour, which is much more perishable since it still contains the bulk of the bran and germ. This is where most of the oils in whole wheat reside which is the primary reason for spoilage.</p> <p><figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="This is an example of a loaf made by Simon Bowden, using a percentage of freshly milled Warthog Wheat." data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/warthog%20wheat%20e_0.jpg" /><figcaption>This is an example of a loaf made by Simon Bowden, using a percentage of freshly milled Warthog Wheat.</figcaption></figure></p> <h2>Choice and Provenance</h2> <p>Another huge advantage to fresh milling whole berries is the ability to buy many different types of wheat and other grains directly from farmers or the many mills here in the U.S. To be honest, it’s something I never thought of or tried until I was buying some flour at a local farmers market. Next to the flours were some whole grains from the same local miller, Four Star Farms in Northfield, Massachusetts. They had Warthog Wheat and Zorro Wheat, which I’d never heard of but definitely wanted to try. These are hard red winter wheats with reasonably high protein content.</p> <p>That was the incentive to purchase my first mill, an attachment for my stand mixer from Wolfgang Mock. It's fun and really easy to use for small batches (more on mills below). The smell and taste of the resulting bake of the Warthog was eye-opening to say the least. I’d never tasted anything quite like it: super fresh, earthy, nutty and slightly sweet. Then I tried the Zorro berries: again, really fresh, definitely nutty and a little sweeter than the Warthog. I was hooked.</p> <p>I’ve tried many varieties since, from ancient grains to modern wheats, from many different farmers and mills. Glenn, Turkey Red, Red Fife, Redeemer, Sonora, Yecora Rojo, Rouge De Bordeaux to name a few. Plus some of the ancient grains, Einkorn, Emmer, Spelt and Khorasan. I’ve also fresh milled rye, corn, barley and oats. I know where they come from, how they were grown, when they were harvested, how they were stored and much more. This is information that’s invaluable when marketing and selling your freshly milled bread.</p> <p>Here’s a brief list of some grain sources I’ve ordered from:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://ansonmills.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Anson Mills</a></li> <li><a href="https://bartonspringsmill.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Barton Springs Mill</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.camascountrymill.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Camas Country Mill</a></li> <li><a href="https://carolinaground.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Carolina Ground</a></li> <li><a href="http://castlevalleymill.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Castle Valley Mill</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.farmergroundflour.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Farmer Ground Flour</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.haydenflourmills.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Hayden Flour Mills</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.heartlandmill.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Heartland Mill</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.kamut.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Kamut</a></li> <li><a href="https://mainegrains.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Maine Grains</a></li> </ul><h2>Grain Milling Equipment</h2> <p>There are many stone mills now available on the market, from the Mockmill attachment previously mentioned to a large or industrial-sized mill suitable for a local bakery that’s going to freshly mill a larger portion of flour. I’d definitely recommend the Mockmill attachment for stand mixers as a great place to start at home or even in a bakery for smaller batches for a cost of about $200. For a larger countertop mill, I’d suggest either the Mockmill 100, Mockmill 200 or the professional Mockmill 200, which range from $300 to $700. I’m currently using the 200 and can mill about 10 pounds of flour in about 20 minutes.</p> <p>At a similar price range is another very good countertop mill: the <a href="https://komo.bio/grain-flour/" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Komo Magic Mill</a>, which ranges from about $500 to $1,000 depending on size. We used this at San Francisco Baking Institute and could mill continuously for hours if needed. For a bigger production, the next step up could be to a much larger <a href="https://www.meadowsmills.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Meadows</a> 8” mill, which will produce about 50 pounds per hour. These start at around $2,000. I haven’t used a Meadows, but a good friend of mine who mills a lot of flour highly recommends this model. Then there are <a href="https://www.newamericanstonemills.com" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">New American Stone Mills</a>, a stunning-looking, larger 26” mill that can produce about 80 pounds of very fine flour an hour. This one's perfect as the centerpiece of a bakery that specializes in milling a lot of its own flours and starts at around $15,000.</p> <p>As another point of reference in terms of ease of use: I’ll fill the hopper of my Mockmill 200 with berries first thing in the morning while I’m scaling other ingredients for mixing. The flour will be a little warm from the grind so mono adjustments in water temperature might need to be made. You can also mill last thing at the end of the day while feeding levain, etc.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CQjSt_gJVz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:540px; min-width:326px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:16px;"> <div style=" display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display:block; height:50px; margin:0 auto 12px; width:50px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CQjSt_gJVz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank"><svg height="50px" version="1.1" viewbox="0 0 60 60" width="50px" xmlns="https://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="https://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"><g fill="none" fill-rule="evenodd" stroke="none" stroke-width="1"><g fill="#000000" transform="translate(-511.000000, -20.000000)"><g><path d="M556.869,30.41 C554.814,30.41 553.148,32.076 553.148,34.131 C553.148,36.186 554.814,37.852 556.869,37.852 C558.924,37.852 560.59,36.186 560.59,34.131 C560.59,32.076 558.924,30.41 556.869,30.41 M541,60.657 C535.114,60.657 530.342,55.887 530.342,50 C530.342,44.114 535.114,39.342 541,39.342 C546.887,39.342 551.658,44.114 551.658,50 C551.658,55.887 546.887,60.657 541,60.657 M541,33.886 C532.1,33.886 524.886,41.1 524.886,50 C524.886,58.899 532.1,66.113 541,66.113 C549.9,66.113 557.115,58.899 557.115,50 C557.115,41.1 549.9,33.886 541,33.886 M565.378,62.101 C565.244,65.022 564.756,66.606 564.346,67.663 C563.803,69.06 563.154,70.057 562.106,71.106 C561.058,72.155 560.06,72.803 558.662,73.347 C557.607,73.757 556.021,74.244 553.102,74.378 C549.944,74.521 548.997,74.552 541,74.552 C533.003,74.552 532.056,74.521 528.898,74.378 C525.979,74.244 524.393,73.757 523.338,73.347 C521.94,72.803 520.942,72.155 519.894,71.106 C518.846,70.057 518.197,69.06 517.654,67.663 C517.244,66.606 516.755,65.022 516.623,62.101 C516.479,58.943 516.448,57.996 516.448,50 C516.448,42.003 516.479,41.056 516.623,37.899 C516.755,34.978 517.244,33.391 517.654,32.338 C518.197,30.938 518.846,29.942 519.894,28.894 C520.942,27.846 521.94,27.196 523.338,26.654 C524.393,26.244 525.979,25.756 528.898,25.623 C532.057,25.479 533.004,25.448 541,25.448 C548.997,25.448 549.943,25.479 553.102,25.623 C556.021,25.756 557.607,26.244 558.662,26.654 C560.06,27.196 561.058,27.846 562.106,28.894 C563.154,29.942 563.803,30.938 564.346,32.338 C564.756,33.391 565.244,34.978 565.378,37.899 C565.522,41.056 565.552,42.003 565.552,50 C565.552,57.996 565.522,58.943 565.378,62.101 M570.82,37.631 C570.674,34.438 570.167,32.258 569.425,30.349 C568.659,28.377 567.633,26.702 565.965,25.035 C564.297,23.368 562.623,22.342 560.652,21.575 C558.743,20.834 556.562,20.326 553.369,20.18 C550.169,20.033 549.148,20 541,20 C532.853,20 531.831,20.033 528.631,20.18 C525.438,20.326 523.257,20.834 521.349,21.575 C519.376,22.342 517.703,23.368 516.035,25.035 C514.368,26.702 513.342,28.377 512.574,30.349 C511.834,32.258 511.326,34.438 511.181,37.631 C511.035,40.831 511,41.851 511,50 C511,58.147 511.035,59.17 511.181,62.369 C511.326,65.562 511.834,67.743 512.574,69.651 C513.342,71.625 514.368,73.296 516.035,74.965 C517.703,76.634 519.376,77.658 521.349,78.425 C523.257,79.167 525.438,79.673 528.631,79.82 C531.831,79.965 532.853,80.001 541,80.001 C549.148,80.001 550.169,79.965 553.369,79.82 C556.562,79.673 558.743,79.167 560.652,78.425 C562.623,77.658 564.297,76.634 565.965,74.965 C567.633,73.296 568.659,71.625 569.425,69.651 C570.167,67.743 570.674,65.562 570.82,62.369 C570.966,59.17 571,58.147 571,50 C571,41.851 570.966,40.831 570.82,37.631"></path></g></g></g></svg></a></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style=" color:#3897f0; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:550; line-height:18px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CQjSt_gJVz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank">View this post on Instagram</a></div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg)"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style=" width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CQjSt_gJVz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by @newamericanstonemills</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async="" src="//www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script><h2>Mixing and Proofing Flour</h2> <p>Just as we have to occasionally adjust to mixing and proofing different types of aged flours and different batches of aged flours, we have to pay equal attention if not more when using freshly milled flours. These aren’t drastic changes but definitely require some getting used to. In general, I find that there’s quite a bit more activity in the initial fermentation using fresh-milled flours versus aged flour, so keep an eye on your first proof and if needed, change FDT a degree or two to compensate for the extra activity. The same can also apply to overnight retarding, and keeping your FDT a little lower before retarding can help adjust the final proof time.</p> <h2>Percentages of Fresh-Milled Flour</h2> <p>As I mentioned above, I’m generally using up to about 30% fresh milled whole grain in my bread depending on what I’m making and what I’m looking for in terms of flavor, texture, crumb, etc. I’m mixing the fresh milled with aged flours like King Arthur Sir Galahad and King Arthur Sir Lancelot, which are generally very consistent overall just as milled aged flour should be. But even when I use a small percentage, around 5-7% in a baguette, I’ll notice a difference in overall flavor from the regular aged flour. At these ratios, the irregularities that one might expect using grains bought directly from a farmer and mailed on-site are fairly easy to manage and adjust to in terms of overall production.</p> <p>I’ve been fortunate to have spent time with two bakers who are buying all their grain directly from local farmers, milling all their own grain, sifting their flours and then using them to make all their bread. They are very experienced bakers who are looking to make a very particular type of product for a certain kind of market and are willing to take on the difficulties of producing bread this way. From this limited observation, I’d say working with 100% freshly milled flours is a challenge for the most experienced bakers to say the least. The results when executed well can be extraordinary, but that path is not for the faint-hearted. So if you’re tempted to step into that world, do so with caution.</p> <p><em>Pursue <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/continuing-ed/artisan-bread-baking" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">artisan bread baking</a> experience at our New York campus or professional training in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info" target="_blank">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts in NYC or LA.</a></em></p> <p><em><sup>REFERENCES:<br /> Simon Bowden, SIMON’S BREADS<br /> Adam Leonti, FLOUR LAB<br /> Peter Rhinehart, BREAD REVOLUTION<br /> Maurizio, THE PERFECT LOAF<br /> Jeffrey Hamelman, BREAD<br /> Roxana Jullapat, MOTHER GRAINS</sup></em></p> Ingredient Exploration Flour Bread Baking Arts Bread Baking <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23266&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="9beb5eIA4BFdcpl1Quum9AmbE5n8Vg2uyb0wDCchWvA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Fri, 16 Jul 2021 13:57:49 +0000 aday 23266 at https://www.ice.edu Chocolate Classes Return to ICE's Bean-to-Bar Lab https://www.ice.edu/blog/chocolate-classes-nyc <span>Chocolate Classes Return to ICE&#039;s Bean-to-Bar Lab</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Tue, 07/13/2021 - 14:52</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/chocolate%20beans%20header.jpg?itok=0-rOFqZ_ Study with Award-Winning Pastry Chef Michael Laiskonis <time datetime="2021-07-13T12:00:00Z">July 13, 2021</time> Michael Laiskonis — Creative Director <p>The deep aroma of roasted cacao beans and the familiar hum of the chocolate machines are back. Though much of the activity in the Institute of Culinary Education bean-to-bar Chocolate Lab was idle for the past year, public-facing educational programs return in August.</p> <p>The Chocolate Lab’s origin story dates back nearly nine years when ICE began to outgrow its New York campus on West 23rd Street. The initial seed of an idea — perhaps carving out a small corner of a kitchen classroom dedicated to chocolate and confectionery projects — soon blossomed into a forward-thinking blueprint to study chocolate on a deeper level. When launched with the completion of the new campus at Brookfield Place in 2015, the lab offered a unique opportunity to provide hands-on experiences in manufacturing chocolate from raw bean to finished bar. Giving visibility to the chocolate-making process enhanced the material studied in our career Pastry &amp; Baking Arts program and offered classes designed for curious chocolate lovers and aspiring makers alike.</p> <p>The chocolate-making process, on its surface, is fairly simple. Raw cacao is roasted, the beans’ outer shells removed and the remainder crushed into the nibs. Those nibs are then ground and further refined with the addition of sugar and perhaps some cocoa butter. Each basic step of the process presents any number of variabilities, and any single step could be performed by a variety of machines that will contribute, in part, to the characteristics of finished chocolate. The suite of machines lined up in the <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/explore-ice/chocolate-lab" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Chocolate Lab</a> include a drum roaster, winnower, hammer mill (which pre-grinds nibs into a paste known as "liquor"), cocoa butter press and temperature-controlled ball mill. Outfitted with equipment originally designed for research-scale production by large manufacturers, the lab’s capabilities allow for batches up to 25 pounds.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cxlEFabizhE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <p>Over five years, a range of regular courses were created, and the lab found a place within the diverse network of artisan makers, academics and chocolate aficionados. A familiar story by now, the initial surge of COVID-19 shuttered schools like ICE, and the Chocolate Lab entered a period of hibernation. Amid strict safety protocols, career training programs resumed, but many of the public programs, from recreational classes to professional development studies, were halted out of caution. The time has now come to reopen the lab, and I’m excited to be reorganizing the space and giving all of the equipment a tune-up in anticipation of our first round of classes this summer.</p> <p>The series kicks off on Aug. 4, with a rebooted version of our exploratory look at the chocolate-making process. <a href="https://recreational.ice.edu/Courses/Detail/15534" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">A Bean-to-Bar Chocolate Experience</a> offers a four-hour tour of the lab and an overview of chocolate from farm to factory. Curious chocolate lovers will gain a broad insight into the various factors that give chocolate its taste and will briefly touch each part of the process before sitting down to a comparative tasting of bars made onsite to further elaborate on these ideas. A companion class, <a href="https://recreational.ice.edu/Courses/Detail/15932" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">Beyond Bean-to-Bar: Fundamental Chocolate Techniques</a>, returns on Sept. 9 and will cover basic skills like tempering and using craft chocolate in a variety of pastry and confectionery applications.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7t9cBmHbwq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:540px; min-width:326px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:16px;"> <div style=" display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display:block; height:50px; margin:0 auto 12px; width:50px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7t9cBmHbwq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank"><svg height="50px" version="1.1" viewbox="0 0 60 60" width="50px" xmlns="https://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="https://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"><g fill="none" fill-rule="evenodd" stroke="none" stroke-width="1"><g fill="#000000" transform="translate(-511.000000, -20.000000)"><g><path d="M556.869,30.41 C554.814,30.41 553.148,32.076 553.148,34.131 C553.148,36.186 554.814,37.852 556.869,37.852 C558.924,37.852 560.59,36.186 560.59,34.131 C560.59,32.076 558.924,30.41 556.869,30.41 M541,60.657 C535.114,60.657 530.342,55.887 530.342,50 C530.342,44.114 535.114,39.342 541,39.342 C546.887,39.342 551.658,44.114 551.658,50 C551.658,55.887 546.887,60.657 541,60.657 M541,33.886 C532.1,33.886 524.886,41.1 524.886,50 C524.886,58.899 532.1,66.113 541,66.113 C549.9,66.113 557.115,58.899 557.115,50 C557.115,41.1 549.9,33.886 541,33.886 M565.378,62.101 C565.244,65.022 564.756,66.606 564.346,67.663 C563.803,69.06 563.154,70.057 562.106,71.106 C561.058,72.155 560.06,72.803 558.662,73.347 C557.607,73.757 556.021,74.244 553.102,74.378 C549.944,74.521 548.997,74.552 541,74.552 C533.003,74.552 532.056,74.521 528.898,74.378 C525.979,74.244 524.393,73.757 523.338,73.347 C521.94,72.803 520.942,72.155 519.894,71.106 C518.846,70.057 518.197,69.06 517.654,67.663 C517.244,66.606 516.755,65.022 516.623,62.101 C516.479,58.943 516.448,57.996 516.448,50 C516.448,42.003 516.479,41.056 516.623,37.899 C516.755,34.978 517.244,33.391 517.654,32.338 C518.197,30.938 518.846,29.942 519.894,28.894 C520.942,27.846 521.94,27.196 523.338,26.654 C524.393,26.244 525.979,25.756 528.898,25.623 C532.057,25.479 533.004,25.448 541,25.448 C548.997,25.448 549.943,25.479 553.102,25.623 C556.021,25.756 557.607,26.244 558.662,26.654 C560.06,27.196 561.058,27.846 562.106,28.894 C563.154,29.942 563.803,30.938 564.346,32.338 C564.756,33.391 565.244,34.978 565.378,37.899 C565.522,41.056 565.552,42.003 565.552,50 C565.552,57.996 565.522,58.943 565.378,62.101 M570.82,37.631 C570.674,34.438 570.167,32.258 569.425,30.349 C568.659,28.377 567.633,26.702 565.965,25.035 C564.297,23.368 562.623,22.342 560.652,21.575 C558.743,20.834 556.562,20.326 553.369,20.18 C550.169,20.033 549.148,20 541,20 C532.853,20 531.831,20.033 528.631,20.18 C525.438,20.326 523.257,20.834 521.349,21.575 C519.376,22.342 517.703,23.368 516.035,25.035 C514.368,26.702 513.342,28.377 512.574,30.349 C511.834,32.258 511.326,34.438 511.181,37.631 C511.035,40.831 511,41.851 511,50 C511,58.147 511.035,59.17 511.181,62.369 C511.326,65.562 511.834,67.743 512.574,69.651 C513.342,71.625 514.368,73.296 516.035,74.965 C517.703,76.634 519.376,77.658 521.349,78.425 C523.257,79.167 525.438,79.673 528.631,79.82 C531.831,79.965 532.853,80.001 541,80.001 C549.148,80.001 550.169,79.965 553.369,79.82 C556.562,79.673 558.743,79.167 560.652,78.425 C562.623,77.658 564.297,76.634 565.965,74.965 C567.633,73.296 568.659,71.625 569.425,69.651 C570.167,67.743 570.674,65.562 570.82,62.369 C570.966,59.17 571,58.147 571,50 C571,41.851 570.966,40.831 570.82,37.631"></path></g></g></g></svg></a></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style=" color:#3897f0; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:550; line-height:18px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7t9cBmHbwq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank">View this post on Instagram</a></div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg)"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style=" width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7t9cBmHbwq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Institute of CulinaryEducation (@iceculinary)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async="" src="//www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script><p>A second-level course for those seeking hands-on skills, <a href="https://recreational.ice.edu/Courses/Detail/15498" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">A Bean-to Bar Chocolate Intensive</a>, is a two-day program taking place Oct. 9-10. This class offers professionals and enthusiastic amateurs an opportunity to touch, smell and taste chocolate throughout the process to better understand the complex cause and effect of each step. The extended format allows the production of a few simple batches, which attendees will temper, mold and take home at the end of class.</p> <p><img alt="Chef Michael Laiskonis runs ICE's bean-to-bar chocolate lab" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Michael%20Laiskonis%20with%20chocolate%20web.jpg" class="align-right" />And finally, for a deeper dive, <a href="https://recreational.ice.edu/Courses/Detail/15875" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">A Bean-to-Bar Chocolate Immersion</a> will convene Nov. 1-4. This four-day course offers a more detailed look into sourcing cacao, agricultural aspects, genetics, flavor chemistry and the complex physics at work in the manufacturing of chocolate. Multiple batches from start to finish will compare origin, formulation and style. This popular course also introduces concepts relevant to chocolate as a business. The intimate class setting also allows for an exchange of information and experience among the students over an immersive 24 hours of lab time.</p> <p>I sometimes joke that the more I learn about chocolate, the more I realize what I don’t know. The only thing I enjoy more than the personal discovery is sharing what I’ve learned with others. Though the physical space of the Chocolate Lab has sat quietly these past months, I’ve only intensified my own study, and I can’t wait to inform and inspire once again as we welcome students back.</p> <p>Get hands-on with Chef Michael in the <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://recreational.ice.edu/Chefs/Detail/303" target="_blank">Chocolate Lab.</a></p> Chocolate Chocolate Lab ICE Chef Recreational Classes <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23246&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="qEf3IrXq5AtJsYy9797p4-G_0as8TlZx4xlA30ZOgps"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 13 Jul 2021 18:52:03 +0000 aday 23246 at https://www.ice.edu https://www.ice.edu/blog/chocolate-classes-nyc#comments Cacao vs Coffee https://www.ice.edu/blog/cacao-vs-coffee <span>Cacao vs Coffee</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/05/2021 - 13:01</span> https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/coffee%20v%20cacao%20header.jpg?itok=wvbbFevZ Pastry chef and chocolate expert Michael Laiskonis compares and contrasts the beans. <time datetime="2021-05-05T12:00:00Z">May 5, 2021</time> Michael Laiskonis — Creative Director <p>Two interests merge in the ICE Chocolate Lab as we explore the similarities and the differences in approaches to roasting coffee and cacao beans.</p> <p>Long before I developed a passion for working with chocolate, I began fostering a love for coffee. I don’t exactly recall the occasion of my first pre-teen taste of coffee, but it subconsciously served as a rite of passage into a mysterious grown-up world. I’m also betting on the likelihood that it wasn’t a very good cup of coffee — most likely pummeled to muddy mediocrity in some pitiless percolator and then served forth in a flimsy Styrofoam cup. In hindsight, the event marked instant access to sophisticated taste, a sense of ritual and increased social capital.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Coffee beans before roasting" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/coffee%20beans%20web.jpg" /><figcaption>Coffee beans before roasting</figcaption></figure><p>Coffee symbolized the exotic and the mundane, the hip and the old-fashioned; chocolate, in a way, represents those same dichotomies. Since then, I’ve always tiptoed along the edge of serious coffee culture. I did play around with some early but uninformed experiments in roasting green coffee, long before coffee’s artisan third wave began 20 years ago and the dissemination of roasting knowledge down to the home enthusiast. One might say that we are at a similar place with chocolate today, with makers and consumers raising the bar of quality and appreciation. In recent months I’ve leaned further into roasting coffee, fascinated by the differences and similarities I found as a chocolate-maker.</p> <p>When I started to learn about wine as a young cook, I got some great advice from a sommelier I worked with. He suggested I stick to a couple of Old-World regions first to learn the lingo and how to taste and then branch out into other origins and styles of wine from there. To this day, those two regions (the Rhône Valley for red, the Loire for white) remain sentimental favorites. Probably because I had some degree of fluency in cacao when I started making chocolate, I went the opposite way, wanting to play with all the beans from everywhere all at once, embracing all their variabilities. Now that I’m roasting coffee, I’m going back to the focused approach. At the moment, I’m limiting myself largely to Central America and drilling deeper into a few regions in search of interesting beans, identifying the nuances of terroir, cultivar and processing, all while learning to achieve consistent, predictable roasts.</p> <p>Interestingly, the consumption of coffee and cacao emerged beyond their origin into Europe around the same time, gaining a popular foothold in the 17th century. Prior to that, coffee thrived in East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, while cacao-based beverages were limited to the cultures of Central and South America before the arrival of Spanish conquistadors. The convivial culture of the coffee and chocolate houses evolved, and clear camps of preference emerged; chocolate, interestingly, was favored by some as a more nourishing and healthier beverage with a milder stimulating effect than coffee. Though coffee (and for some, tea) would become a ritualized part of our daily routine, chocolate went on to lay claim to a much wider range of applications beyond the cup and into desserts and confections.</p> <p>Coffee and cacao grow within the same tropical belt and share common origins and producer countries from Africa to Central and South America, Oceania and Southeast Asia. Cacao prefers low-lying forest conditions, while coffee quality is generally linked to higher altitudes, the most complex flavor profiles attributed to elevations beginning around 1,000 meters above sea level. Both can be broadly separated into cheap commodity beans and fine flavor grades; quality in cacao and coffee is highly dependent on origin, varietal and post-harvest processing as well as roasting, and for chocolate, subsequent manufacturing steps. Both are the seed of a fruit — the coffee "cherry" and the cacao pod that contains 30-40 seeds or beans. While much of chocolate’s flavor is developed during a lengthy fermentation process, for coffee, a short fermentation has less impact on flavor and is more a means of separating the seed from the fruit. From a composition perspective, cacao beans contain much more fat (50% versus 14%) while coffee beans have a greater percentage of carbohydrates or sugars (50% versus 20%). Dried cacao beans have a moisture content from 6% to 8%, while green coffee beans contain 8% to 12% moisture. Under proper storage conditions, both cacao and green coffee are stable for months before processing.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-right"><img alt="Cacao beans in the ICE Chocolate Lab" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cacao%20beans%20lab%20web.jpg" /><figcaption>Cacao beans in the ICE Chocolate Lab</figcaption></figure><p>The mechanics of roasting coffee and cacao, on the surface, are quite similar. Both benefit from the even heat of a rotating drum roaster, where the beans are in constant motion, but the similarities end there. The intensity, duration and chemical processes differ. Coffee likes a hot-and-fast approach while cacao requires less heat and more time. This is, in part, due to the size of the beans. On average, the weight of cacao is 10 times that of a coffee bean. Flavor development for both begins at the point when moisture loss occurs. The higher bean temperature required for coffee (in excess of 200 C/400 F) results in caramelization of sugars, and for darker roasts, pyrolysis – thermal decomposition that might also be described as controlled burning. As they roast, coffee beans expand, turning from green to brown, and audibly crack ("first" and "second" crack mark notable points in roast development). With the momentum of the high heat, coffee bean flavors develop rapidly, and the profile can shift drastically in a matter of seconds.</p> <p>By contrast, cacao beans are treated in a comparatively low-and-slow manner. Flavor development during roasting is largely based on chemical precursors formed during post-harvest fermentation. Proteins, or amino acids, and "reducing" sugars react with heat to produce Maillard reactions and Strecker degradation. Though Maillard reactions typically result in the browning of foods, the brown color of chocolate is due in large part to the fermentation process, though roasting can contribute. In contrast to the high temperatures associated with coffee, the final bean temperature might range from 120 C/250 F for light roasts to 135 C/275 F for the deepest roasts. In cacao, there is also a subtractive element to roasting; volatile and vinegary acetic acid resulting from fermentation is driven off. High-quality beans of both cacao and coffee generally tend to reveal subtle nuances and complexity when roasted on the lighter side. With experience and control of the many variables, roasters can pinpoint the ideal parameters for beans of specific origins, genetics and processing.</p> <p>At the end of roasting, coffee and cacao both require rapid cooling, or quenching, to halt the process. Both lose a significant amount of weight during the roast due primarily to moisture loss — I expect to lose 5% in cacao and up to 14% in coffee. In addition to moisture loss, coffee also releases "chaff" — its paper-thin husk — during the roast. Cacao’s more substantial shell requires additional processing (winnowing) to remove. The transformation into finished chocolate requires several steps after roasting; and while coffee brewing is an art and science itself, roasting, with all its subtlety, is the primary processing step. Freshness is considered key to optimal coffee flavor, but just-roasted beans are typically aged for a day or two (or up to a week) before grinding and brewing to allow for the de-gassing of carbon dioxide created during the roasting process. Finished chocolate is often aged, too, as flavors do shift over time, though there is little published research to explain how those flavors change.</p> <p>I’ve come to appreciate both approaches necessary when working with coffee and chocolate — and I find that better understanding one helps inform how I view the other. I like to say that the more I learn about cacao and chocolate, the more I realize I don’t know, and as I continue down the path of coffee that statement rings doubly true, as slight variations of the green beans or a few seconds in the roaster might translate into a very different cup.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="yt-embed" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8Inkm6kUEZU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0&amp;enablejsapi=1"></iframe> </div> <p><em>Pursue a career in chocolate with ICE's <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/career-programs/school-pastry-baking-arts" target="_blank">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts program.</a></em></p> Chocolate Chocolate Lab Pastry Arts ICE Chef <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-11356" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1631059413"></mark> <footer> </footer> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/11356#comment-11356" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Coffee and Chocolate</a></h3> <p>Submitted by Annamarue canadeo on <span>May 9, 2021 5:25am</span></p> <p>We never realize the sultilties of making good coffee and good chocolate.. fascinating,,, thanks</p> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=11356&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="mBk94sYwvGrhNH7EvZtLo0cqqpBSzk5nK20rk01KOd8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <article data-comment-user-id="0" id="comment-11366" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1631059447"></mark> <footer> </footer> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/11366#comment-11366" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Chocolate &amp; Coffee</a></h3> <p>Submitted by Daniel Cosgriffe on <span>May 11, 2021 7:14pm</span></p> <p>As a former pastry chef, wish I could afford much higher quality chocolate, however, I work with 70% callebaut, almost a couverture chocolate. As a rule when making hot chocolate for my Love, I will caramelize the organic sugar, use a vanilla bean or two, a few tbs of butter, always adding some Himalayan salt, a cinnamon stick or two and then sometimes adding some or all of powdered ginger, cloves or nutmeg in varying amounts. I also use goat milk and never go beyond heating this all up but for a few bubbles, never boiling and burning the chocolate. All this all makes a decent hot chocolate.</p> <p>And then I’m able to acquire amazing coffees from a great shop here in Toronto called The Coffee Bouquets. This place has coffees from the Himalayan Mountains and the Galápagos Islands and everywhere in-between. Some of my favourites are Kaffa from Ethiopia and beans from the Flores Island in Indonesia, but one that makes amazing mocha and is great with a little 10% cream are coffee beans from Cuba. I’m not always able to get Cuban beans, but when I can I’m generally in heaven. Heck my partner likes her mocha 2/3rds hot chocolate and 1/3rd coffee and can still taste the amazing coffee!</p> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=11366&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="SZlNcPD4P_Jsm2cjwp34KgooHWx5YAAAUADHd012Kts"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=22936&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="ylDvLYAEeA4znY99TNujjUbF_jFKXF6ySSJYI_HjGo0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Wed, 05 May 2021 17:01:13 +0000 aday 22936 at https://www.ice.edu